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Old 11-11-2007, 05:01 PM   #16
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I don't want to cause exploding heads!

I actually pulled that 5A straight from the installation manual.... It's for 2 low voltage underwater lights that are 3 watts each. I didn't see a 5A GFCI breaker at my local store so I thought I would chance it on here

If I add up all the circuits, it is 95A. The way it's set up there is no chance more than 60A will be running at one time. Would a 70A breaker in my main panel work or should I go higher?

Thank you for the help.

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Old 11-11-2007, 05:09 PM   #17
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75A is the minumium (sometimes I can't spell s***) you can install based on those #'s.

That being said, I'd install 100A.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:33 PM   #18
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Perfect. I will see if I can find a model number on my main panel to see if I can find some documents online to see what I can put on it. stubbie mentioned the buss stab rating so I need to find that out.

Thanks!
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:49 PM   #19
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I proud to say BJones is my kid, and I appreciate all the help you guys are giving us.
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:07 PM   #20
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As an interesting footnote...My nerdish quest to analyze the 2008 shows that my post#2 will soon no longer apply. The 200A in the sub (using it as a disconnecting means) will be illegal.
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy in ATL View Post
As an interesting footnote...My nerdish quest to analyze the 2008 shows that my post#2 will soon no longer apply. The 200A in the sub (using it as a disconnecting means) will be illegal.

Andy if you dont mind if you give me the art # ?? i know i havent get chance to check all the details [ being i am on 05 right now and my state delted the AFCI for now ]but have to find out how much more mess it will intertwine on the 08 cycle.

Merci, Marc
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Old 11-11-2007, 07:03 PM   #22
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I might have it backwards... wouldn't be the first time. Look at 408.36 in '08.
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Old 11-11-2007, 07:13 PM   #23
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Andy :

right now i dont have the 08 code book with me atm.,, [ it is in my shop office ]

but as soon i get that book on hand i will read that info.

Merci, Marc
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:14 PM   #24
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Quote:
If I add up all the circuits, it is 95A. The way it's set up there is no chance more than 60A will be running at one time. Would a 70A breaker in my main panel work or should I go higher?
I think they add up to 85 amps? 30+20+20+15 = 85 amps Anyway you don't add the breakers its the load they serve that matters. But adding the breakers would certainly make your feeder breaker big enough.....

Since your serving a pool this will be a pool feeder and will need to be ran in conduit all the way from panel to panel. Use pvc. All conductors must be insulated and the ground (green) also.You didn't say if indoors or outdoors for the pool location. The sub-panel needs to be 3r rated for wet conditions if you mount it outside. A 6 space 12 circuit panel will be a good choice this will allow you one extra space than what you are listing as the required # of circuits. The 12 means that if you install all 120 volt single pole breakers that are the tandem style you can get 12 circuits. However all your breakers that you will be installing to serve the pool are gfci and will be full size breakers so you will use up all but one of the six spaces. You could use the last space for other uses. If you put in a 20 amp tandem breaker in this space you could generate two 20 amp branch circuits. Regardless whatever panel you buy needs 5 full size spaces most will be 6 or greater in the 100 amp class.

Without the actual load requirements of the pool... sizing the feeder is not possible at least if you want it sized to the minimum requirements of the pool equipment. Without those numbers I would go with the main panels maximum bus stab rating. If your main is 100 amps it is probably going to be somewhere around 70 or 80 amps max. branch circuit or feeder breaker. This should be on the panels cover specifications sheet. If not post the panel model # and I'll check for you. With that we can size the maximum feeder the panel will support.

This appears to be a decent load that will have to be supplied from the main panel so if it has a lot of demand on it presently, before the addition of the endless pool, you have a possibility of the main breaker tripping out on overload.




Bone up on pools/spas art. 680 you can read it here........ starts on page 16

http://www.mikeholt.com/files/PDF/Pooldownload.pdf

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Last edited by Stubbie; 11-11-2007 at 08:27 PM.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:34 PM   #25
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I've never seen 680.43(C). I wonder how many times I've violated that one.

"Wall switches must be located at least 5 feet measured horizontally from the inside walls of the spa or hot tub" (talking about an indoor tub... say, in a masterbath)

Oh SNAP!!! For a standard tub it just can't be inside. Everytime I think I know something....

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