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capt2 10-03-2007 07:46 PM

Stove Top wire
 
I have a 4 burner stove top. I decided to change out the wire since it was really old aluminum and only 3 wire (2 hots & 1 ground tied with stove neutral) I pulled new 4 wire (8 GA) from the panel and saw the J-box coming from the stove top was fed with 4 wire 12 GA (stranded)

I thought this odd and unsafe--a 40 amp breaker stove top to ultimately have 12 GA wire. (no clue why, but I'm positive I saw 12 awg printed on the wire.) My plan is to change the breaker to 30A.

Does this sound reasonable???? Thanks!!!

HouseHelper 10-03-2007 08:49 PM

If you mean the whip that is supplied with the cooktop contains the smaller wire, that is OK. The insulation on this wire is rated higher than your normal house wiring and can handle the amperage.

capt2 10-03-2007 09:50 PM

Yes it is the whip from the stove. I think it's 20 yr or so older, and I know it's not THHN wire. But still........12 Ga stranded on a 40 Amp breaker????????

I'm guessing the drop-dead max for this wire would be in the low 30 amp range. Shouldn't I be concerned about the wire overheating long before its 40A. breaker blows??

darren 10-03-2007 10:06 PM

Don't worry about it, appliance manufactuers play by different rules then us electricians. It has been in your house for a while and your house has not burned burned down so it is safe. I am sure there is some safety sticker on there to prove that is safe.

Another place you see that alot is in flurocent fixtures, they are usually #18 wires from the ballest but you have to hook at least #14 to it.

J. V. 10-04-2007 12:09 PM

#12 gauge wire must be on a 20 amp breaker or smaller.
Appliance manufacturers usually use a higher temperature rated insulation than THHN ECT... Thus smaller gauge wire.

Is this a stove top or range? If it is a range you need a 50 amp breaker with your #8 wire.
If it is a stove top, use the nameplate rating for the correct breaker size.

HouseHelper 10-04-2007 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J. V. (Post 66283)
#12 gauge wire must be on a 20 amp breaker or smaller.
Appliance manufacturers usually use a higher temperature rated insulation than THHN ECT... Thus smaller gauge wire.

Not always the case. If the 12ga is on the factory supplied whip, the installation is compliant with a 40A breaker if that is what the naneplate of the appliance requires.

Quote:

Is this a stove top or range? If it is a range you need a 50 amp breaker with your #8 wire....
If it is 8/3NM, the maximum breaker allowed is 40A.

Andy in ATL 10-04-2007 09:38 PM

There are times that a 12AWG could be on a 50A breaker and still be compliant.

frenchelectrican 10-04-2007 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy in ATL (Post 66390)
There are times that a 12AWG could be on a 50A breaker and still be compliant.

the only time they will allow that is the HVAC or motor circuit it is very specficed in art 430 and 440 and used for short circuit protetion if the system have it own overload protection there

the main thing is make sure you read the nameplate on that equiment to verify the info.

Merci , Marc

P.S. there are few very specal wire type they will allow much higher OCPD as well but kinda pretty much out of the scope of most diy's anyway

J. V. 10-05-2007 01:41 PM

Househelper, I was not referring to factory installed wiring (whips). We all know these can be smaller than the supply conductors. Motors would be a good example.

I was wrong on the 50 amp breaker. I was using my head instead of my code book.
Article 316.16. 8/3 NM does have a maximum rating of 40 amp. As it is 60c wire. Thanks for the heads up.


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