DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Electrical (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/)
-   -   is stapling cable to beams/studs a code req ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/stapling-cable-beams-studs-code-req-23082/)

amakarevic 07-02-2008 10:56 AM

is stapling cable to beams/studs a code req ?
 
or just an option left to those neat-minded. if so, how frequently do they have to be set (like every foot or so) ?

Termite 07-02-2008 11:40 AM

Yes, wires have to be secured. You're supposed to secure within 12" of a fixture as I recall, and every 4-1/2' of run. Honestly, if it is secured I never hassle someone, and I'd never consider taking a tape measure to the staple spacing unless they're really leaving out staples.

J. V. 07-02-2008 12:18 PM

If you are fishing the wires into an existing wall, or ceiling that has no access no staples are required.

HouseHelper 07-02-2008 12:27 PM

And it is within 8" of a single gang plastic box.

Termite 07-02-2008 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HouseHelper (Post 135384)
And it is within 8" of a single gang plastic box.

The 8" requirement is an exception to the 12" rule for when a box without any kind of cable clamp is used. (IRC table E3702.1, footnote H) Some plastic boxes have integral "clamps", some do not.

Like I said, if the inspector is hassleing you on this, he's looking for things because he's a jerk, or you're really left some major staples out...Or he's PO'd at you for something! I have called it, but only when a builder wants to dispute everything with me. I tend to be more "thorough" when someone's being unprofessional!

Pudge565 07-02-2008 09:24 PM

I thought that it was within 6" of a box.

Termite 07-02-2008 11:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pudge565 (Post 135530)
I thought that it was within 6" of a box.

Nope.

jimmy21 07-03-2008 12:12 AM

as a standard ive always done within 6" of every box and every 4 feet to allow some wiggle room. but the code says:

334.30 Nonmetallic-sheathed cable shall be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings designed and installed so as not to damage the cable, at intervals no exceeding 4 1/2 feet and within 12 in of every outlet box, junction box, cabinet, or fitting.
334.30(A) basically holes in wood count as being supported
334.30(B)(1)You don't have to support the cable if its fished in a wall
(2)you don't have to support within 12" of equipment of light fixtures or equipment if the connection is accessible


Do yourself a favor and run all your wires with 90 degree angles, don't make your attic look like a spiderweb, run everything together from the panel and then make hard turns from there

macwall 07-03-2008 12:57 AM

Hi, i'm new to this forum and need some advice. We have a new hollow wall (no studs) system where the wiring is secured and clamped at the top of the wall and is loose in the wall to the switches and outlets where a clip (not the boxes) secures the wire into the electrical box. The walls are thick enough to protect the wire. Question, can this be considered to code? Or can this be approved by whom? We have been getting a wide range of options even from City inspectors, probably due the unique design.
Thanks!

jimmy21 07-03-2008 01:12 AM

for a new installation. no that would not be code at all. Who knows if it was legal when it was installed. Id leave it alone though. if it aint broken, don't fix it

Termite 07-03-2008 09:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by macwall (Post 135594)
Hi, i'm new to this forum and need some advice. We have a new hollow wall (no studs) system where the wiring is secured and clamped at the top of the wall and is loose in the wall to the switches and outlets where a clip (not the boxes) secures the wire into the electrical box. The walls are thick enough to protect the wire. Question, can this be considered to code? Or can this be approved by whom? We have been getting a wide range of options even from City inspectors, probably due the unique design.
Thanks!

Is the wiring and/or the wall system new? If so, I'd require that the wire be supported per code by an approved method. That's the problem with some of these new basement finishing panel systems.

I'd suggest contacting your wall system's manufacturer to see how the product's listing suggests dealing with this code issue.

Jim Port 07-03-2008 09:42 AM

Does this system just have built-in chases for the wiring to be run in?

Perhaps the inspector would consider this the same as fishing a cable where it is not required to be secured.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:08 AM.