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Old 04-30-2012, 08:19 PM   #1
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Split receptacles in kitchen


I have a single receptacle with 12/2 on a GFI (20 amp). I ran a 3 wire (14 gauge) to my other two receptacles and put a tandem breaker in the panel. Should I wire the receptacles as single receptacles on individual GFI's or split receptacles? They are more than a meter away from the sink. Also I have read the two 15 amp circuits should be on separate phases? How do I insure this? Thanks gentlemen!

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Old 04-30-2012, 08:22 PM   #2
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Split receptacles in kitchen


I'm assuming you are in Canada?

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Old 04-30-2012, 08:23 PM   #3
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Are you in Canada?

You can usually tell inside a panel how the phases are split up. The other way to tell is to install the breaker and check the voltage at the terminating screws, if you get 240, you are on two different phases and if you get 120V, you are on the same phase.

15A GFI are not code in a kitchen, you will need to put in a split 15A.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:24 PM   #4
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Split receptacles in kitchen


A couple of questions:

1) Are you in Canada? Rules are different in the Great White North ...

2) Did you use a real "tandem" breaker? Or a "double-pole" ??
There is a difference:
A double pole would be appropriate in this situation; a tandem would not.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:59 PM   #5
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Thanks for your responses.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:01 PM   #6
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Split receptacles in kitchen


LMAO
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:14 PM   #7
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Split receptacles in kitchen


Not a true double pole. It can have a bridge installed. Its a Square D mini breaker. Two breakers on one with two separate 15 amp circuits. Its a single phase panel. I have been told i need to install the tandem breaker on two separate "legs" since posting this. Or run one hot wire to one receptacle and one to the other and leave the breaker where it is. The wire is already ran and drywalled over. I would like to adhere to code if possible to save removing cabinets and making holes etc, if possible. Sorry K buz, I'm multi-tasking. It's funny to me too

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Old 04-30-2012, 10:19 PM   #8
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Split receptacles in kitchen


From what you are describing this is a fire hazard no matter where you live. The neutral will be overloaded and since the neutral isn't fused, you are risking burning it up.

You need a 2 pole breaker NOT a tandem breaker.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:29 PM   #9
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Split receptacles in kitchen


That makes sense. Thanks for your patience. Appreciate your input. So adding a two pole breaker to supply the two receptacles will give me a second neutral and give me the ability to have two receptacles on split circuits. I will need to run a second three wire line back to the panel? I obviously want to do this correctly.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:35 PM   #10
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Split receptacles in kitchen


No a 2 pole breaker will not give you a second neutral, what it will do is feed the two circuits from opposite phases. When two circuits are fed from opposite phases, the neutral current will in effect cancel each other out. So, if you have 10A on one circuit and 5A on the opposite circuit, the neutral will carry only 5A (10A-5A).

If you have those two circuits (sharing the neutral) on the same phase it would be an additive condition. Using the same example, you would have 15A on the neutral.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:46 PM   #11
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Split receptacles in kitchen


I'm understanding what you are saying regarding the neutral balancing out the current. How would you resolve my situation. Can I use the single 3 wire line and feed two separate receptacles if I remove the bridge between the top and bottom receptacle on the hot side only?
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:49 PM   #12
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I cannot comment on your situation. I am not familiar with the CEC.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:54 PM   #13
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Split receptacles in kitchen


Fair enough. I do appreciate you sharing your knowledge of how the double pole breaker functions, thank you
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanec1 View Post
I'm understanding what you are saying regarding the neutral balancing out the current. How would you resolve my situation. Can I use the single 3 wire line and feed two separate receptacles if I remove the bridge between the top and bottom receptacle on the hot side only?
Yes you can feed two separate receptacles with your 14/3, both plugs will need to be split. One circuit can't do one plug while the other circuit does the other plug. If you do this hopefully you have a big box because there will be lots of wires in the box.
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:39 PM   #15
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Split receptacles in kitchen


I will also need to switch to a double pole breaker as stated earlier. Is this the best way to resolve this? I don't mind doing some extra work now to make this right. Thanks for responding

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