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paxprobellum 08-26-2009 07:06 PM

Splicing on 6 gauge wire
 
Hey all --

I recently added a new line for my electric dryer by splicing into a 6/3 wire carrying 220V to my electric range. Its all said and done now (and working fine), but my father-in-law was concerned that splicing into a 220V line might not be up to code. Any electricians here care to chime in?

(If you are interested in my long and arduous outlet installation, you can read about it here: http://firstoldhouse.blogspot.com/20...yers-suck.html )

jerryh3 08-26-2009 07:17 PM

Did you bond the j-box?

paxprobellum 08-26-2009 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 319785)
Did you bond the j-box?

I'm not sure what you mean -- are you referring to attaching a ground wire to the junction box?

EDIT: You can see the entire wiring job in this picture. (BTW: The electrical tape was just put on there to hold the wires together so I could screw on the wingnut easier -- it ends where the wingnut starts.)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_iLbfBv8pRD...00-h/clean.jpg

Scuba_Dave 08-26-2009 07:33 PM

Usually dryers are rated 30a, ranges are rated 50a

What size breaker do you have installed & what are the 2 appliances rated for?

You can't run a 30a dryer on a 50a breaker

paxprobellum 08-26-2009 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kornbln (Post 319790)
Why would you tap into the range circuit?

So I wouldn't have to run a new breaker.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 319794)
What size breaker do you have installed & what are the 2 appliances rated for?

You can't run a 30a dryer on a 50a breaker

Its a 60A breaker. When we installed the range, that's what we were told was necessary. I've since decided its a bit of overkill. It doesn't seem like it would be an issue to have more amperage than required -- is it?

jerryh3 08-26-2009 07:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paxprobellum (Post 319788)
I'm not sure what you mean -- are you referring to attaching a ground wire to the junction box?

EDIT: You can see the entire wiring job in this picture. (BTW: The electrical tape was just put on there to hold the wires together so I could screw on the wingnut easier -- it ends where the wingnut starts.)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_iLbfBv8pRD...00-h/clean.jpg

I just now went back and read what you did. I thought you just extended an existing circuit. Take the splice out and run a new wire for the dryer. It's not overkill, it's just wrong.

Scuba_Dave 08-26-2009 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paxprobellum (Post 319795)
So I wouldn't have to run a new breaker.

Its a 60A breaker. When we installed the range, that's what we were told was necessary. I've since decided its a bit of overkill. It doesn't seem like it would be an issue to have more amperage than required -- is it?

YES - VERY BAD
Nothing will prevent that 30a dryer from pulling 60a in case of a problem - which it is not rated for
Put a new run in & a 30a breaker
Dryers are a VERY big cause of fires

DO NOT leave this setup like this :eek:

paxprobellum 08-26-2009 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 319796)
I just now went back and read what you did. I thought you just extended an existing circuit. Take the splice out and run a new wire for the dryer. It's not overkill, it's just wrong.

Uh oh. That doesn't sound particularly enthusiastic. What's the underlying issue here?

Scuba_Dave 08-26-2009 07:46 PM

Violates NEC electric code to an extreme & possible fire

jerryh3 08-26-2009 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 319803)
Violates NEC electric code to an extreme & possible fire

That pretty much sums it up.

paxprobellum 08-26-2009 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kornbln (Post 319806)
As others have stated, using a 60 amp breaker for a 50 amp range isnt overkill - it's wrong and dangerous. You can't protect a wire with a breaker that's rated for more than the wire can handle.

Erm. I don't think that's what is being said. I think they are saying a 60A breaker is too much for the dryer, which is typically a 30A breaker.

Quote:

Originally Posted by kornbln (Post 319806)
By tapping into the range circuit, you could potentially put 80 amps on your 60 amp circuit which would trip the breaker any time you tried to dry your jeans and cook dinner.

Theoretically speaking. Though I wouldn't really consider this a problem. It seems like the issue is if the dryer pulls 60A from the circuit, it would fry itself.

In other words, the problem with the wiring is a dryer that isn't being protected by the circuit breaker. Right?

Scuba_Dave 08-26-2009 08:12 PM

As long as the range is rated for 60a then the 60a breaker is fine for the
range
I always verify the Mfg instructions for breaker size
If it was a salesman that told you 60a was fine double check it
--especially if it was from a big box store

jbberns 08-26-2009 08:13 PM

My tv draws 3 amps and it's on a 20 amp circuit?
And code allows oversizing breakers for motor loads and some other things. Don't have it in front of me but, I can prove it.

Scuba_Dave 08-26-2009 08:23 PM

You can't compare a TV to a dryer

paxprobellum 08-26-2009 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 319818)
As long as the range is rated for 60a then the 60a breaker is fine for the
range
I always verify the Mfg instructions for breaker size
If it was a salesman that told you 60a was fine double check it
--especially if it was from a big box store

So I just double checked my range installation instructions:

This appliance must be supplied with the proper voltage and frequency, and connected to an individual, properly grounded, 40 amp (minimum) branch circuit protected by a circuit breaker or time-delay fuse ...

A range cord rated at 40 amps with 125/250 minimum volt range is required. A 50 amp range cord is not recommended, but if used, it should be marked for use with nominal 1 3/8" diameter connection openings.


Seems to indicate to me that 40 amps is the minimum, but 50 amps is okay. How far up the amperage meter does this logic go? :P


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