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-   -   Is this Speedaire compressor wired for 240v? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/speedaire-compressor-wired-240v-129197/)

tsayyote 01-08-2012 03:03 AM

Is this Speedaire compressor wired for 240v?
 
Hey all, I picked up a used Speedaire compressor and was installing it today and I was under the impression it was wired for 240v but the plug had 125v stamped on it so now I'm confused and I don't quite understand the wiring diagram. The guy I bought it from had mentioned that this motor can be swapped over to 120v (I have no intention of running it on 120v, though) although I see no mention of it being dual voltage on the name plate.

Can anyone tell me if it looks like I'm wired up for 240v or 120v by these pictures? I do want to use it on 240v. I'm hoping its wired for 240v but I don't know why it would have a 125v plug on it (plug has 3 prongs arranged in a circle) The compressor model is 4b236b and motor is 9tc62a.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0862.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0870.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0882.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0873.jpg

motor:
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0874.jpg

plug
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0884.jpg

white wire appears to be more heat affected (bubbles in the plastic)
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...e/IMAG0885.jpg
Thanks!!

-Chase

frenchelectrican 01-08-2012 03:29 AM

Can you take a photo of the plug itself ?

For the connection on the motour swap the yellow et white leads around and it should be in right spot.
( leave the #4 connection the bottom yellow connector alone do not move that one )

Merci,
Marc

tsayyote 01-08-2012 03:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frenchelectrican (Post 816022)
Can you take a photo of the plug itself ?

For the connection on the motour swap the yellow et white leads around and it should be in right spot.
( leave the #4 connection the bottom yellow connector alone do not move that one )

Merci,
Marc

Edited my post above with a couple pictures of the plug.

I plan to attach a NEMA 6-50P plug to the compressor since that is what my miller welder uses that way I don't have to have a separate receptacle.

NJMarine 01-08-2012 05:55 AM

It is possible that the former user used the 120 twist lock for 240. I you stated there is nothing on the data plate that this is dual voltage unit. I looked thgis up and it not dual voltage. It is 240 @ 15 amps

Hardway 01-08-2012 06:41 AM

Per NEC
Motor amps X 125%
Continuous duty line de-rated at 80%

So 15 amps X 125% = 18.75 amps
30 amps x 80% = 24 amps
20 amps x 80% = 16 amps
Per the sticker on the motor 240V 15 amps continuous duty
So in my opinion 240V 30 amp circuit

This is for discussion purpose only and should be confirmed by another source!

Speedy Petey 01-08-2012 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hardway (Post 816061)
Per NEC
Motor amps X 125%
Continuous duty line de-rated at 80%

So 15 amps X 125% = 18.75 amps
30 amps x 80% = 24 amps
20 amps x 80% = 16 amps
Per the sticker on the motor 240V 15 amps continuous duty
So in my opinion 240V 30 amp circuit

This is for discussion purpose only and should be confirmed by another source!

A) Just because the motor is "continuous duty" does NOT mean this is considered a continuous circuit. So the 125% requirement is not mandatory.
You have to remember the definition of continuous duty. An air compressor will NEVER be "expected" to run for three hours or more.

B) We do NOT use both the 125% of the load and 80% of the circuit. You can use one or the other.
So even if this were a continuous load it would be appropriate on a 20A circuit.

Of course, since this is a motor load it can be wired with #12 and even be on a 30A breaker since motors follow different codes. IMO since this is a residence I personally don't use those motor rules. The application is not permanent and who knows who will have their hands in things later on or if the current owner moves, leaving an under protected circuit and receptacle.

Speedy Petey 01-08-2012 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NJMarine (Post 816049)
It is possible that the former user used the 120 twist lock for 240. I you stated there is nothing on the data plate that this is dual voltage unit. I looked thgis up and it not dual voltage. It is 240 @ 15 amps

I agree. The other guy just hacked in the wrong plug and receptacle to make it work.
I hope he goes to plug something else into that "120v" receptacle that he has and lets all the smoke out. :laughing:

brric 01-08-2012 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hardway (Post 816061)
Per NEC
Motor amps X 125%
Continuous duty line de-rated at 80%

So 15 amps X 125% = 18.75 amps
30 amps x 80% = 24 amps
20 amps x 80% = 16 amps
Per the sticker on the motor 240V 15 amps continuous duty
So in my opinion 240V 30 amp circuit

This is for discussion purpose only and should be confirmed by another source!

The motor is rated for continuous duty. The appliance is not continuous duty. The motor is 15 amps @ 240 volts as the motor label clearly shows.

Speedy Petey 01-08-2012 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tsayyote (Post 816023)

I plan to attach a NEMA 6-50P plug to the compressor since that is what my miller welder uses that way I don't have to have a separate receptacle.

Well, the motor is thermally protected so while not ideal, this is at least safe.

bobelectric 01-08-2012 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 816073)
I agree. The other guy just hacked in the wrong plug and receptacle to make it work.
I hope he goes to plug something else into that "120v" receptacle that he has and lets all the smoke out. :laughing:

That's wishing people well.

Speedy Petey 01-08-2012 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobelectric (Post 816090)
That's wishing people well.

That's just my style. :thumbsup:

Anyone who puts a 120v receptacle on a 240v circuit deserves the consequences.

At the same time I congratulate the OP on scoring a NICE compressor.

kbsparky 01-08-2012 09:03 AM

That should be about a 2½hp motor. (It's NOT listed on the motor)

I wonder what the advertised hp rating is on that compressor? Betcha it's more than that!

tsayyote 01-08-2012 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kbsparky (Post 816136)
That should be about a 2½hp motor. (It's NOT listed on the motor)

I wonder what the advertised hp rating is on that compressor? Betcha it's more than that!

Appreciate the feedback! I was told that this is a 5HP motor but as you can see, the nameplate has peeled back a little bit and it is not legible so I have no idea what it's rated at. I picked the compressor up for $325 with a spare head that needs only a new connecting rod, so I feel it was a steal! :thumbup: The previous owner owned a machine shop and needed to upgrade to a more powerful compressor.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 816075)
Well, the motor is thermally protected so while not ideal, this is at least safe.

Would installing a safety interlock or some sort of fuse panel at the compressor be a good idea? I'd rather be safe than sorry. I had a separate circuit with a 30amp breaker and about 30ft of 8awg wire ran to the garage so I could use my welder, I hope this circuit is good enough for the compressor.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 816073)
I agree. The other guy just hacked in the wrong plug and receptacle to make it work.
I hope he goes to plug something else into that "120v" receptacle that he has and lets all the smoke out. :laughing:

This is what I'm hoping the other owner did instead of incorrectly wiring this motor for 120v. So according to how its wired vs the wiring diagram, is it safe to say that all I need to do is attach a new plug or do I need to move some wires around?



I really appreciate the help everyone's given so far!!!

Hardway 01-08-2012 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric (Post 816074)
The motor is rated for continuous duty. The appliance is not continuous duty. The motor is 15 amps @ 240 volts as the motor label clearly shows.

I am going to have to respectfully disagree with you. That motor is rated at 15 amps and under load draw up to around 18 am on start up. Running a sand blaster or an inline sander, it can and will run more then 3 hours continuously. The same basic compressor with same rating manufactured by Ingersol Rand requires a 30 amp circuit. Also running a 30 amp circuit on number 12 wire doesn’t make sense. Also that Speedair compressor is supposed to be hard wired and not a plug. Just my opinion.:no:

tsayyote 01-08-2012 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hardway (Post 816500)
I am going to have to respectfully disagree with you. That motor is rated at 15 amps and under load draw up to around 18 am on start up. Running a sand blaster or an inline sander, it can and will run more then 3 hours continuously. The same basic compressor with same rating manufactured by Ingersol Rand requires a 30 amp circuit. Also running a 30 amp circuit on number 12 wire doesn’t make sense. Also that Speedair compressor is supposed to be hard wired and not a plug. Just my opinion.:no:

If hardwiring is recommended, then that's what i'll do. Only reason for a plug was so that I could easily disconnect it if I need to transport it.

I called Grainger, thankfully the 1-800 number is 24/7 and was able to get a copy of the owners manual. There is a small wiring diagram in it that might be useful, so I uploaded it.

http://pdfcast.org/pdf/speedaire-4b236b-owners-manual


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