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Old 09-17-2012, 09:33 AM   #1
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Sleeving cable in pipe down to a panel


Hi guys, I have a question. I was told that if a conduit is only 2' long you don't have to worry about derating, is that correct?

If I run a pair of 2" conduits out of the top of a panel into the ceiling, I can run romex cables down into the panel through the conduits? Is it ok that there are no connectors to hold the cables?

On a different note, if I wanted to run the cables to a box in the ceiling and make splices to individual conductors in the box and then run the conductors down the conduit into the panel, I can do that as long as the conduits are less than 2 feet long?

Is this all correct? Right now I am just exploring options and trying to learn the different ways, thanks!

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Old 09-17-2012, 10:11 AM   #2
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Sleeving cable in pipe down to a panel


Using the sleeve like you describe is only an option for a surface mounted panel.

Conduits 24" or less do not require derating for the conductors inside.

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Old 09-17-2012, 01:14 PM   #3
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Sleeving cable in pipe down to a panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Using the sleeve like you describe is only an option for a surface mounted panel.
The panel in question would be surface mounted. Just out of curiosity, you can't sleeve when flush mounting?
Quote:
Conduits 24" or less do not require derating for the conductors inside.
What about not using a connector when running romex thru them, is that ok?

How many romexes or individual conductors can be run inside of 2" conduit?j
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Old 09-17-2012, 01:19 PM   #4
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Sleeving cable in pipe down to a panel


This is from the 2011 National Electric Code book (not the handbook);

312.5 Cabinets, Cutout Boxes, and Meter Socket Enclosures.
Conductors entering enclosures within the scope of this article shall be protected from abrasion and shall comply with 312.5(A) through (C).
(A) Openings to Be Closed.
Openings through which conductors enter shall be adequately closed.
(B) Metal Cabinets, Cutout Boxes, and Meter Socket Enclosures.
Where metal enclosures within the scope of this article are installed with messenger-supported wiring, open wiring on insulators, or concealed knob-and-tube wiring, conductors shall enter through insulating bushings or,
in dry locations, through flexible tubing extending from the last insulating support and firmly secured to the enclosure.
(C) Cables.
Where cable is used, each cable shall be secured to the cabinet, cutout box, or meter socket enclosure.
Exception: Cables with entirely nonmetallic sheaths shall be permitted to enter the top of a surface-mounted enclosure through one or more nonflexible raceways not less than 450 mm (18 in.) and not more than 3.0 m (10 ft) in length, provided all of the following conditions are met:
(a) Each cable is fastened within 300 mm (12 in.), measured along the sheath, of the outer end of the raceway.

(b) The raceway extends directly above the enclosure and does not penetrate a structural ceiling.
(c) A fitting is provided on each end of the raceway to protect the cable(s) from abrasion and the fittings remain accessible after installation.
(d) The raceway is sealed or plugged at the outer end using approved means so as to prevent access to the enclosure through the raceway.
(e) The cable sheath is continuous through the raceway and extends into the enclosure beyond the fitting not less than 6 mm (
14 in.).

(f) The raceway is fastened at its outer end and at other points in accordance with the applicable article.

(g) Where installed as conduit or tubing, the allowable cable fill does not exceed that permitted for complete conduit or tubing systems by Table 1 of Chapter 9 of this Code and all applicable notes thereto.



Informational Note: See Table 1 in Chapter 9, including Note 9, for allowable cable fill in circular raceways. See 310.15(B)(3)(a) for required ampacity reductions for multiple cables installed in a common raceway.

Pay attendion to the informational note.

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Last edited by electures; 09-17-2012 at 01:29 PM.
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