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Old 02-07-2011, 09:57 AM   #1
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Single Circuit


My understanding from a previous thread is that running a 10-2 cable from my house panel (20 Amp breaker) to my tractor shed junction box constitutes a single circuit (no need for a sub panel in the shed). Two questions: 1) What is the proper way tie the three 12 ga. wires for outlets and lights to the 10-2 in the junction box and 2) is this still a single circuit by definition?
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Old 02-07-2011, 11:05 AM   #2
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My understanding from a previous thread is that running a 10-2 cable from my house panel (20 Amp breaker) to my tractor shed junction box constitutes a single circuit (no need for a sub panel in the shed). Two questions: 1) What is the proper way tie the three 12 ga. wires for outlets and lights to the 10-2 in the junction box and 2) is this still a single circuit by definition?
It sounds like you have the shed already wired for lights / plugs? They run in the JB you described? A picture would be good here to know for sure. You can rund the 10/2 conductor and connect the black to the black and the white to the white. The bare (or green) ground to the ground wire and pigtail it to bond the JB.
Hope this helps
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Old 02-07-2011, 01:01 PM   #3
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No, not yet. I'm just planning this thing now. I just want to know if you just twist up 3 12-2 hots onto the 10-2 hot or if there was some sort of hot bar like in a panel.
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Old 02-07-2011, 01:06 PM   #4
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No, not yet. I'm just planning this thing now. I just want to know if you just twist up 3 12-2 hots onto the 10-2 hot or if there was some sort of hot bar like in a panel.
Connecting different size wires under a wire nut is OK
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Old 02-08-2011, 06:24 AM   #5
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Thank you Charlie!
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Old 02-08-2011, 06:36 AM   #6
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not allowed anyplace ive worked anyway,id run it to a small disconect with a couple breakers would be better and much safer if theres ever a problem in the shed/garage.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:16 AM   #7
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Single Circuit


Most AHJ's (Authority Having Jurisdiction) will require a disconnecting means in a separate, freestanding building. Sub panels are very inexpensive and it will solve your question / concern on how to connect the wires in the j-box. If this is a project you are in the process of planning, I would plan a small sub-panel rather than a j-box. It is safer and will be in place should you decide to expand your electrical system in the shed at a later date. www.belcoinc.com
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Old 02-08-2011, 09:05 AM   #8
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Single Circuit


Can I use a cheaper regular breaker at the shed even if I have a GFCI at the house?
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Old 02-08-2011, 11:30 AM   #9
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First. It is perfectly fine to run a single circuit to your shed. You do not have to use a sub panel if you don't think you need one. In this scenario, a disconnect is required by the NEC, but a simple light switch just like you have inside your house can legally be the disconnecting means.
You need no ground rod either. You don't need a GFCI protected circuit to the shed. You do need it inside the shed and only for the receptacles.

If you should decide to go with a small sub panel, search this forum for more information than you could ever read. Good Luck.
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Old 02-08-2011, 12:08 PM   #10
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JV,
Thanks. Your info requirements matches up with what I had learned so far on my "200' to the shed post". I would like 4 switches: 1) To the fridge which will be on all the time, 2) to the 2 receptacles for odds and ends (radio, cordless charger, small fan, 3) to the inside 4' florine light, 4) the under the shed-roof motion light. If I have to run the circular saw or small air compressor, I can switch off the fridge or unused so I don't overload it. I was advised to use the GFCI since I am going underground to the shop. Thanks for any help or suggestions.
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Old 02-08-2011, 12:26 PM   #11
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J.V.
Could the OP run 10/3 as a MWBC. This would give him more options.
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Old 02-08-2011, 01:14 PM   #12
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The 10-3 is an option for $60 more for 250'. What could I do with that?
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Old 02-08-2011, 02:09 PM   #13
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I thought 10-3 would make this a multi-circuit and require a panel?
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Old 02-08-2011, 02:22 PM   #14
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I think 10/3 is a good suggestion. It will allow you to run a 240v circuit if you so desire giving you much more flexibility and negating the need to GFCI protect the circuit from the house to the shed since the GFCI rule applies only to 15 & 20 amp, 120V circuits. GFCI protection for the receptacles inside the shed is still required but you can do that by installing GFCI devices rather than GFCI breakers. If you are going to endure the labor and trouble to bury the line, you might as well put in a line that can handle both 120v or 240v.
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Old 02-08-2011, 03:08 PM   #15
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My chats on this site have been like buying a new truck...I start off wanting a basic and end up with everything. Oh Well. Question: For $500 bucks for material only, and the basic wish list above, what would you do? 8-2, 8-3, 10-3, 10-2...what would get me the most bang for my buck?
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