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Old 10-06-2006, 12:19 PM   #16
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


well it may make a different, may be the switch is a graduate type ...etc. my toaster not letting you turn on the switch if it is unplug... may be it is for that reason... don't know how they do that... you know electronics, resisters, capacitors, ...etc... they can build spaceship, a toaster with such functionality is not really a big deal...

consider toaster is a 1000 degree oven... jwhite view makes sense...

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Old 10-06-2006, 01:12 PM   #17
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


Sorry Kui****g, but a toaster is a big resistor and nothing else. A resistor does not have an "inrush" current like a motor or other inductive load. Toasters do not need to have acceleration ramps like motor drives...at least I've never seen one that you could parameterize. If the toaster is not defective, it should NOT trip the breaker when plugged in. Side note: The toaster should not repeatedly be plugged in when turned on because the plug will be subjected to arcing that is supposed to be happening inside the toaster switch, which is built to take it...and it is true that newer toasters won't stay "down" unless they are plugged in first.
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Old 10-06-2006, 01:39 PM   #18
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


OK, let me goes into this game of academic... now if the toaster is being turn on... pluging in means the switch is actually the plug and the your hand... now I have reason this manual/mechanical switch not be as professional as the toaster original switch. You are talking about comparing a metal touch metal directly using a hand switch, kind of all or nothing connection.... where as the toaster original switch is a sliding type, who know what they are but they must have its value, at least the movement is now so sharp... so different type of switch causing the trip is, in academic sense, make sense,... as one is an unstable switch(you know, people's hand vibrate), one is mechanical professional switch... built in the toaster...

now is that fullfill your academic discussion....
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Old 10-07-2006, 09:06 AM   #19
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


what did he say?
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Old 10-07-2006, 09:55 AM   #20
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


Quote:
Originally Posted by KUI****G View Post
OK, let me goes into this game of academic... now if the toaster is being turn on... pluging in means the switch is actually the plug and the your hand... now I have reason this manual/mechanical switch not be as professional as the toaster original switch. You are talking about comparing a metal touch metal directly using a hand switch, kind of all or nothing connection.... where as the toaster original switch is a sliding type, who know what they are but they must have its value, at least the movement is now so sharp... so different type of switch causing the trip is, in academic sense, make sense,... as one is an unstable switch(you know, people's hand vibrate), one is mechanical professional switch... built in the toaster...

now is that fullfill your academic discussion....
Academic discussion, or drunken discussion?

I'm a college graduate, veteran electrician, and MENSA member since 1988, and that was among the most incomprehensible pieces of writing I've read in a while.

What he's saying is:
  • if the toaster was in the on position when it was plugged in and,
  • you didn't insert the attachemnt cord into the receptacle quickly and sharply, then
  • the high current inrush at first contact of the cord's prong may have (and probably would) make a dramatic spark
This is a common customer complaint for me. "I plugged in XYZ, and sparks flew out of the receptacle". It's almost always a high current appliance like a toaster, griddle, clothes iron, space heater, hair dryer, etc. My response is generally, "Was it on or off when you plugged it in?".

The switches in high current appliances have a "quick make/quick break" action, which causes them to have minimal internal sparking. They make and break so quickly, that the arc extinguishes as quickly as it is established. You can't always insert an attachment cord (under load - with the appliance on) in such a manner to keep it from sparking.
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Old 10-10-2006, 09:06 AM   #21
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


thank you that is somewhat what I meant, except not as details as you specified...
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Old 10-10-2006, 09:22 AM   #22
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


I think the Babelfish may have been partly responsible
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Old 10-10-2006, 09:59 AM   #23
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Should I replace my GFI or call an electrician?


I did type too fast. I want to retract the part about the breaker tripping. You guys are right, this is very unlikely. However it could explain the spark that someone is worried about that is in reallity not a problem. Unless you consider the damage being done to the recepticle and cord cap. They are not designed with contacts to handle the spark like switches are.

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