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Old 10-31-2009, 05:46 PM   #1
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I have a 30 x30 shop and am doing some remodeling. I put a new ceiling in and am ready to put up lighting. My ceiling height is 9 ft and is OSB I have decided on 8 ft HO fixtures because I don't heat it all the time and I want the brighter light when I first turn them on. My question is how many do I need for an area this size and how should they be placed to give the best lighting, Also would there be a better, more economical choice for this area. any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Barry

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Old 10-31-2009, 06:48 PM   #2
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I'm going with 6" recessed cans in my 24x36 garage
They are $45-50 for 6 w/trim rings
I can use anywhere from 13w-23w CFL floods = equiv to 60w-100w incandescent

That way I can replace bulbs with lower/higher wattages as needed
Plus the power use is way down from incandescents
I tested 75 w equiv CFL's about 4' apart & they were very bright

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Old 10-31-2009, 06:55 PM   #3
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I would put up 6to 8 About 3 ft off the wall then measure your distance and do the math.
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Old 10-31-2009, 06:57 PM   #4
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3 rows of 3 fixtures each = 9

You will need 2 circuits to handle the load, however.
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:36 PM   #5
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Illuminance
(lux)

Toilets 100
Instrument assembly 1500
Garment manufacture - sewing 750
School classrooms 500
Cinema auditorium 50
Kitchen work areas 500
Hospital ward at night 1
Operating theatre (local lighting) 100,000
Supermarket 750

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lux

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Old 10-31-2009, 09:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
3 rows of 3 fixtures each = 9

You will need 2 circuits to handle the load, however.
Two circuits? Wouldn't that depend on the load that he plans on. If he goes with cans using CFLs I would think he could get buy with one circuit.

I am not an electrician, however my brother in law is. When he wired my shed he put up nine fixtures on one 15amp circuit. I am using 23watt CFLs in them.
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Old 10-31-2009, 09:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
3 rows of 3 fixtures each = 9

You will need 2 circuits to handle the load, however.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenknee View Post
Two circuits? Wouldn't that depend on the load that he plans on. If he goes with cans using CFLs I would think he could get buy with one circuit.

I am not an electrician, however my brother in law is. When he wired my shed he put up nine fixtures on one 15amp circuit. I am using 23watt CFLs in them.
I think he means if he goes with the 8' HO lights, depending upon fixture
Each dual 8' T12 fixture takes (2) 95w bulbs = 9 * 190 w = 1710w
That should work on 1 20a circuit

T-8 triple light fixture takes 172w for 3 bulbs - about the same wattage

Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 10-31-2009 at 10:37 PM. Reason: oops I can't add
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Old 10-31-2009, 09:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I think he means if he goes with the 8' HO lights, depending upon fixture
Each dual 8' T12 fixture takes (2) 95w bulbs = 9 * 180 w = 1620w
That should work on 1 20a circuit

T-8 triple light fixture takes 172w for 3 bulbs - about the same wattage
Thanks for the clarification.
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Old 10-31-2009, 11:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I think he means if he goes with the 8' HO lights, depending upon fixture
Each dual 8' T12 fixture takes (2) 95w bulbs = 9 * 190 w = 1710w
That should work on 1 20a circuit.....
Actually, if you use cold temp bulbs, they are 110 watts each. The OP stated his reasoning for using high output fixtures was that the shop was not heated. Cold temp bulbs work best in such an environment.

110 watts per bulb x 2 bulbs per fixture x 9 fixtures =1980 watts. Assuming a power factor of 90%, you are looking at 2200 VA. That amounts to 18.3 Amps.

If you plan to use them more than 3 hours at a time (continuous load), then a single 20 Amp circuit would not be enough.

I would use (2)-15 Amp circuits, which should offer plenty of capacity.
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Old 11-01-2009, 01:29 AM   #10
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The second choice I will use from time to time is 6 lamp 32WT-8 flourscent luminaire that will put out about 200 ish watt { that including the ballast(s) } that is strictly good grade luminiare that is very quiet and you don't hear the buzzing noise at all.

I know they are not that cheap but it worth extra buck due couple reason one is electronic ballast that genrally a very good grade ballast in there and second thing that most luminiare I deal with it as I mention above it do have silver reflector to aim the light downward driection.
Third thing is that you can able use common 32W-T-8 bulbs.

I have enclosed verison which it will work in frezzer useage which the tempture will go low as -25C and it do work pretty well once it get warm up in couple minutes.

but for common strip the 8 foot HO is good one with reasonable price but from time to time you wil hear the ballast buzzing unless you got electronic verison then it will be very quiet.

As KBsparky mention unheated area the 8 foot HO are 110 watts " low tempture " bulb and yes they do come in standard tube and jacketed verison aka a bulb sleeve to protect the bulb plus to keep the bulb warm in super cold ervoment area.

The standard 90/95 watts 8 foot HO do not work very well when it get colder than 50F

Merci,
Marc

To OP:
Why not paint the ceiling white that will really help a bit with light reflection to shine down a bit { yeah my shop I do paint tan colour to help to reflect the light up a bit to look brighter plus what more easy to clean the floor to boot }

Last edited by frenchelectrican; 11-01-2009 at 01:34 AM.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:02 AM   #11
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Thanks for the info on the cold start, my garage will be insulated & unheated
I have (6) T-8 fixtures with 3 bulbs each = 96w per fixture
I'll use those as added light at the back of the garage for the work area
They are the electronic ballasts & you are right - I have never heard a buzz
They were free - one place I worked was renovationg a new location & getting rid of them
I gave some to a friend. but small house then & no room for storage
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Old 11-01-2009, 12:59 PM   #12
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Dave .,
Belive or not just open up one of any flourscent luminaire and many time it will useally list the min starting tempture I know electronic ballast will list it but mangatic it kinda like shooting in dark some will list it and some don't.

Anyway with common 3 or 4 lamp T-8 ballast the lowest temp they will operated useally around either 20F or 0F depending on the model.

However if you going to use in the garage espcally above the workshop area I really suggest get the sleeve kit those are pretty cheap insuarance so when you working on something and ya hit the bulb you don't want the glass falling on ya or make a mess on workbench plus a nice benift to use the sleeve is when you used in unheated area that will help to keep the bulb little more warmer so it will stay little more brighter.

Merci,Marc
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:52 PM   #13
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In Canada when figureing out the circuiting for this we have to go by the amperage on the ballast and not the wattage of the bulb. I assume that is different in the US and you go by the wattage of the bulb, this is more for my curiosty then for the OP.
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:17 PM   #14
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I've tested 5 of the fixtures, 4 are working need to test the 6th
The one that isn't working may just have a broken wire
I'm going to test one to see how much poer it draws
According to the bulbs (32w each) should be around 96w
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Old 11-01-2009, 09:07 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darren View Post
In Canada when figureing out the circuiting for this we have to go by the amperage on the ballast and not the wattage of the bulb. I assume that is different in the US and you go by the wattage of the bulb, this is more for my curiosty then for the OP.
This is correct. Too often folks do not consider that power factor can have an effect on the overall loads on the circuits. This is why I included power factor in my calculations showing that more than one circuit would be needed.


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