Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-21-2009, 09:58 PM   #61
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Brooklyn, New York (NYC)
Posts: 1,124
Share |
Default

shock in shower


As 220/221 said "It's tough to fix when it ain't broke". But Congrats. for bonding all the metal pipes to Ground. That did the trick. No matter what. There will not be a discernible potential difference between any metal pipe and ground. Don't Drink and Drive!!! (wish I could import some smilies to "Quick Reply"!!!

spark plug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2009, 07:14 PM   #62
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Default

shock in shower


I'm always learning something on this forum. . .
http://www.dairyland.com/media/produ...literature.pdf
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2009, 07:26 AM   #63
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 17
Default

shock in shower


Any thoughts on my question from above ........................

"I have a question. It seems that bonding (since I have plastic pipe coming into the house from the well and all copper inside) will just cause electricity to feed into my plumbing if there is a problem from the outside. Or is a copper ground so efficient that the path of least resistance will be to ground versus through the water in the shower?

Anyone have further thoughts on this???? "

I realize that since I have an electric water heater that my plumbing was already tied to my ground.
Another thing that still bothers me is that i could never see the high voltage again after the elec company visited me the 1st time and said they found nothing. The 2nd time they installed the neutral isolator. I'm not saying they are not being truthful. Just am puzzled why I never saw the high voltage again ..... I may never know.
tbwoods is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2009, 08:58 AM   #64
My License Ain't 4 Sale..
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Atlanta, Ga/Hamilton, Al
Posts: 1,813
Default

shock in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by tbwoods View Post
Any thoughts on my question from above ........................

"I have a question. It seems that bonding (since I have plastic pipe coming into the house from the well and all copper inside) will just cause electricity to feed into my plumbing if there is a problem from the outside. Or is a copper ground so efficient that the path of least resistance will be to ground versus through the water in the shower?

Anyone have further thoughts on this???? "

I realize that since I have an electric water heater that my plumbing was already tied to my ground.
Another thing that still bothers me is that i could never see the high voltage again after the elec company visited me the 1st time and said they found nothing. The 2nd time they installed the neutral isolator. I'm not saying they are not being truthful. Just am puzzled why I never saw the high voltage again ..... I may never know.

I believe Stubbie addressed this above. But I will add that it may be a coincidence with the power company, or the act of troubleshooting may have removed the problem without anyone knowing.

If it was the heater, it may have just reached a point in its failure that actually removed the fault. Bonding your plumbing does tie it to the electrical system. But this is a good thing, because if a hot wire or faulty appliance (water heater) directly energizes the pipes, a breaker will trip. If it is indirect through a resistance, the current will take the least resistive path and avoid unlucky people in the way.

Unbonded pipes lead to your problem, or worse. If a hot wire had directly energized the pipes while ungrounded, it would have just sat there waiting for a path, and this may have been through somebody.
InPhase277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2009, 11:26 AM   #65
UAW SKILLED TRADES
 
Stubbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,854
Default

shock in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by tbwoods View Post
Any thoughts on my question from above ........................

"I have a question. It seems that bonding (since I have plastic pipe coming into the house from the well and all copper inside) will just cause electricity to feed into my plumbing if there is a problem from the outside. Or is a copper ground so efficient that the path of least resistance will be to ground versus through the water in the shower?

Anyone have further thoughts on this???? "

I realize that since I have an electric water heater that my plumbing was already tied to my ground.
Another thing that still bothers me is that i could never see the high voltage again after the elec company visited me the 1st time and said they found nothing. The 2nd time they installed the neutral isolator. I'm not saying they are not being truthful. Just am puzzled why I never saw the high voltage again ..... I may never know.

Part of the problem is chasing voltage. Voltage can be a odd thing to track down as many times it is just phantom. Digital voltmeters read phantom voltages all the time and voltages much higher than 50 are not uncommon. In your case you were reading a voltage from the plumbing of the shower to a metal drain cap that was connected to a plastic drain. So essentially you were seeing the potential difference between the metal drain cap and the metal plumbing. Imo this was due to the pipes not being bonded. Since there was no conductive path that we know of that current could flow from the plumbing to the drain.... a better way to have checked the plumbing would have been to extend a ground into the shower so that you could check the plumbing to a known return path to the transformer. I'm not sure you or the electrician made that measurement. At 50 volts and using a digital voltmeter (unless you were using an analog type) wouldn't necessarily alarm me until I investigated further. The problem I saw was that you say you were actually feeling a shock which tells me you had a current flow. Which led to us being concerned about your water heater. But it is the current that is a more important indicator of a serious problem. So what I would like to have seen was a good return path to the transformer connected to that plumbing. And then a current reading on that return path. You have done that now with the bonding. But it is important that you bonded correctly by bonding both hot and cold together then extending that bond to the neutral bar of the main service equipment panel. If you have done that any real unwanted voltage from some electrical source will show its ugly face with current flowing to the transformer on that bonding wire to the panel neutral bar. You might put a clamp on meter around that bonding wire and see what you have as to current. If you bonded correctly and no breakers tripped then you certainly don't have a line voltage problem from the metal plumbing and a live wire...so the next issue is neutral current either inside or outside sourced. the breaker can't see that current. I doubt that it is outside as the POCO seems to have done there thing to prevent it. None the less you are not getting shocked any more after bonding the pipes assuming it was done correctly. I would simply make sure you do not have current on that bonding conductor for your water pipes.
I know this has been frustrating and the problems you originally found can be very elusive and no 'smoking gun' other than no bond to the metal pipes has been discovered.

__________________
" One nice thing about the NEC articles ... you have lots of choices"

Stubbie

Last edited by Stubbie; 07-23-2009 at 11:40 AM.
Stubbie is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plumbing in the shower head obeans Plumbing 3 03-11-2009 03:08 PM
Honey, I'm going to re-caulk the shower... homebound Remodeling 1 02-10-2009 09:11 AM
Shower Pan Liner Problem Hottrod33 Plumbing 9 02-02-2009 01:02 PM
Backerboard under Fiberglass Shower Pan? BillyDIY Plumbing 2 12-17-2008 01:47 PM
redoing basement shower - basic questions (relocating drain/options I have) mslide Plumbing 5 10-28-2008 10:42 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.