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user62587 09-17-2009 09:34 AM

Grounding question with service to a new House
 
Hello All.

I have a question concerning my new house.

Once my connections are made I plan on hiring an electrician to check my work but I figure I will ask so that he can tell me it is correct rather then incorrect and trying to charge me $75 an hour.

I will have 200AMP service to my new house. I have buried three 4/0 wires in conduit and purchased the materials for the hookup. The meter socket is mounted at the house and includes a 200AMP disconnect. I have also purchased a breaker box for inside the house which also includes a 200 amp break to turn the whole box off.

Here is my question, I have 3 wires coming from the pole to my meter socket and main disconnect.

The hookup there is pretty self explanatory. The wire with the yellow strip goes to the neutral and the two hot wires with no colors connect to the two hot plugs.

On the other side there are a total of 4 big lugs for 4/0 wire and then the small lugs for the copper which will go to the two grounding rods.

On the breaker box that goes in the house though I only have three large lugs for wires. The two hot are again pretty self explanatory as is the neutral. My question is that when I had the electric supply company bring me the wire for inside I told them the inside run as 15 to 20 feet so they brought me what they said was “?SVR?” wire which is 3 which are in their own shields and one wire which looks to be just bare aluminum.

All 4 of these wires are in a sheath. I don't know where the bare wire goes or if it doesn't get hooked up or what.


Thanks for any adn all help.

Hunter

PaliBob 09-17-2009 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhunterthompson (Post 328776)
I plan on hiring an electrician to check my work .... rather then incorrect and trying to charge me $75 an hour.

Not a good way to start.Electricians are your friend. Installing a Service is not a DIY project. Be Safe
.

user62587 09-17-2009 10:48 AM

extra wire?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 328803)

Not a good way to start.Electricians are your friend. Installing a Service is not a DIY project. Be Safe
.

While I appreciate the input your reply wasn’t really helpful in the least.

It was my understanding that if I have the main disconnect grounded via the ground rods then I only run three wires to the panel.

As I said, the connections are self explanatory and the POCO will inspect it prior to hooking it up to the pole regardless of who strips the wires and tightens the lugs. If they don’t like how it looks they will not hook it up.

Is grounding some tightly held secret?

It seems like the wire I was given to go from the main disconnect to the panel has an extra wire in the sheath. If it doesn’t then I am way out of my league and I apologize.

junkcollector 09-17-2009 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhunterthompson (Post 328812)

Is grounding some tightly held secret?

No, It is just expected to have the basics down before you take on a project of this magnitude.

Check out this link:
http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/home-...meter-2002.php

user62587 09-17-2009 11:08 AM

Thank you fo rthe link
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by junkcollector (Post 328824)
No, It is just expected to have the basics down before you take on a project of this magnitude.

Check out this link:
http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/home-...meter-2002.php

Thank you for the link. It appears that the wire that was sent indeed has 4 wires in it when only three are needed.

HouseHelper 09-17-2009 11:28 AM

If you have a main disconnect outside then that is the only place the neutral and ground are connected together. Any other panels fed from this main are considered subpanels and must be fed by four wires... 2 hot, neutral. and ground. The neutral and ground in the subpanel are NOT connected together; the neutral bar is isolated from the panel enclosure; the ground bar is bonded to the panel enclosure.

The supply company sent you the correct wire. I would try to get a licensed electrician involved now. It may be difficult to find one later that will sign off on your work.

user62587 09-17-2009 12:08 PM

Thank You
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HouseHelper (Post 328837)
The supply company sent you the correct wire. I would try to get a licensed electrician involved now. It may be difficult to find one later that will sign off on your work.

Thank you. I appreciate the informative answer.

I will contact an electrician to find out about grounding the panel.

joed 09-17-2009 01:14 PM

You probably need to buy an additional ground bar and DO NOT install the green bonding screw in the neutral bar that came with the panel. This is considered a sub panel.

user62587 09-17-2009 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 328866)
This is considered a sub panel.

Is the diagram below (from teh sticky at the top of this page) an accurate description of how to connect the sub panel?

http://www.dropshots.com/stubbie4#al...09-04/20:03:00

I appreciate the information.

Thank You

Code05 09-17-2009 02:33 PM

1. your cable is SER-Service Entrance Round.
2. You need a permit, Power company will not hook up without inspection.
3. that braided mesh is your grounding wire, it gets twisted up and installed in your separate ground bar in the sub panel, and with the neutral in the main panel/disconnect.

Thurman 09-17-2009 02:36 PM

I suppose this will be more of a question to all, than any answer: In the link that was shared with you, it shows a ground from the MAIN panel to a water pipe (NEC 250.50) along with an earth ground rod connection. In my area this would be a moot point as almost all homes built here now have a "plastic" line service from the water meter to the home and then PEX within the home. I understand the "cold water pipe ground" as it used to be here, and the connection had to be something like within five feet of the water line entering the home. So, is this still an NEC 250.50 requirement or a suggestion in today's world? OH-jhunter, I have helped (I'm not an electrician) pull the "SVR" wire for connecting an outside main to an inside sub-panel. The aluminum wire wrapped around the other three conducters was always used as a ground from one panel to another. Twisting that darn AL. wire to fit into a lug was not easy. Good Luck, David

Code05 09-17-2009 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thurman (Post 328890)
I suppose this will be more of a question to all, than any answer: In the link that was shared with you, it shows a ground from the MAIN panel to a water pipe (NEC 250.50) along with an earth ground rod connection. In my area this would be a moot point as almost all homes built here now have a "plastic" line service from the water meter to the home and then PEX within the home. I understand the "cold water pipe ground" as it used to be here, and the connection had to be something like within five feet of the water line entering the home. So, is this still an NEC 250.50 requirement or a suggestion in today's world? OH-jhunter, I have helped (I'm not an electrician) pull the "SVR" wire for connecting an outside main to an inside sub-panel. The aluminum wire wrapped around the other three conducters was always used as a ground from one panel to another. Twisting that darn AL. wire to fit into a lug was not easy. Good Luck, David

The water pipe connection is for copper or steel pipe only. You have to connect within the first 5 feet where it enters the house and the pipe must have at least 10 feet of lenghth in the ground going out. If the water lines meet the criteria it must be used.

J. V. 09-19-2009 12:02 PM

Try this. It's also at the top under "Stubbies" diagrams.

http://www.dropshots.com/stubbie4#al...09-04/20:03:00


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