Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-06-2009, 05:20 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 241
Send a message via AIM to Bocolo
Share |
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


Hello,
The more I read this subject the more I get confused. I have been told (not questioning anyone just tyring to educate myself) that I can wire multiple receptacle outlets either by pigtailing the wires or runing the wires to one set of screws and then from the second set of screws to the next receptacle outlet. Now, if I am understanding what I am reading (which I am probaly not) the only way you can wire in parallel is to use pigtails (??) and if you wire from set of screws to set of screws then you are wiring in series (??). Ok, so where and how does this statement takes effect: "When wires are part of a three wire circuit, it is not permitted to feed the white conductor through by using the two screws on the side of the receptacle because removing a receptacle could place 120 volt loads in series on 240 volts" I am assuming a "three wire circuit" is a 12/2 cable with a ground, or is this where I am mistaken? Thanks for your time and help in advance.

Bocolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 05:39 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,802
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


All receptacles are wired in parallel. The terms series and parallel are often misused when talking about house wiring. The "three wire" circuits they are referring to are multi-wire branch circuits.
http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_multi...anch_circuits/


Last edited by jerryh3; 02-06-2009 at 05:42 PM.
jerryh3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 05:43 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 241
Send a message via AIM to Bocolo
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


Quote:
Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
All receptacles are wired in parallel. The terms series and parallel are often misused when talking about house wiring. The "three wire" circuits they are referring to are multi-wire branch circuits.
Thanks for your time and response. So wether you are using pigtails or using the set of side screws you are wiring in parallel? Forgive my ignorance but what exactly are "multi-wire branch circuits". Thanks again for your time.
Bocolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 05:50 PM   #4
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 7,397
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


A MWBC is a circuit that use two hot wires and only one neutral. The hot wire share the neutral. The hot wires must be on opposite legs of the service.

The service wires feeding your house work on the same principle. Two hot wires and a neutral.
joed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 06:12 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,802
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bocolo View Post
Thanks for your time and response. So wether you are using pigtails or using the set of side screws you are wiring in parallel? Forgive my ignorance but what exactly are "multi-wire branch circuits". Thanks again for your time.
Yes, either way they are wired in parallel. Check out these diagrams. (They show DC circuits but the principles are the same)
Points 2, 3, 4 would be the brass terminals of the receptacle. 7, 6, and 5 would be the silver.
http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_5/1.html
jerryh3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 07:17 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 241
Send a message via AIM to Bocolo
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


Ok. I think I am beginning to understand. Because there are two sets of electrically common points no matter how you wire receptacles they are parallel. To make sure I understand. If I wired three lamps and connected the black source to the black on the lamp 1, then white from lamp 1 to black on lamp 2 and white from lamp 2 to black on lamp 3 then white from lamp 3 to white on source. This will be a series wiring? If any lamp was out the others will not function because of the break in the circuit? Correct? What applications would require to wire in a series if the above is true? Why wire in series? Thanks once more for your time and responses.
Bocolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 07:57 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,802
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


I think you got it. Light switches, timers, photocells, are applications of series wiring in residential AC circuits. In DC circuits, batteries, speakers, resistors, can be wired in series for different effects.

Last edited by jerryh3; 02-07-2009 at 07:49 AM.
jerryh3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 07:59 PM   #8
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 7,397
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


You are correct. The only thing wired in series in your home is a switch. It is in series with the fixture to be able to turn it off.
joed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 08:40 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 241
Send a message via AIM to Bocolo
Default

Series or Parallel Outlets


Thanks for all your replies and help. I understand this now.

Bocolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Series or parallel runronno Electrical 29 07-17-2009 11:40 AM
parallel / series wiring question geetee Electrical 5 06-11-2008 02:42 PM
Diagram of dual hot water heater (s) in parallel not series having flow questions-- timlltt Interior Decorating 1 02-29-2008 03:01 AM
series of troubled outlets Swimmfst Electrical 9 06-14-2006 06:26 AM
Parallel vs. Series Circuit johnson217 Electrical 1 06-19-2005 10:03 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.