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Old 05-27-2011, 12:40 AM   #1
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Schedule 40 or 80?


I will be moving my meter base and therefore having to replace the 4' run of conduit from the socket on the outside of the house to the load center in the inside basement. Currently the conduit is 2" steel but I would like to replace it with PVC. The local POCO says it is fine to use Schedule 40, but I am concerned that the electrical inspector will want Schedule 80. Are there any guidelines for when pipe is or isn't subject to damage? (I would try to ask the inspector but they are very hard to get in touch with!) Thanks!

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Old 05-27-2011, 12:50 AM   #2
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Schedule 80, I think, is required for above ground use in areas subject to damage. Sched 40 would be for undergroumd.

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Old 05-27-2011, 12:54 AM   #3
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Schedule 40 or 80?


That's my understanding too, but it is unclear exactly when the conduit is "subject to damage". Does that mean any time the conduit is above ground? Or only certain circumstances -- like conduit on the front of a garage that could be driven into?

In my situation, the conduit runs vertically on the house siding from the meter socket to an LB where it enters the basement.
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Old 05-27-2011, 06:23 AM   #4
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Schedule 40 or 80?


So this will be above the meter socket? I am having a hard time seeing a socket mounted 3-5' above ground and then going up another 4' to get into the basement.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:12 AM   #5
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Well it it was a walk-out basement maybe and the meter socket was coming from an underground service, but I guess it could even happen with an overhead service and a walk-out basement.

Things that make conduit subject to physical damage that is at ground level, or slightly above or below grade, would be weed whackers and gardenning tools. And 5 year old boys. Nothing below 4' is safe when a 5 year old is around.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:42 AM   #6
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Jim, I didn’t see where the OP mentioned the 4’ run was going up. Did I miss it?

In my area, I’ve haven’t yet had an inspector require Schd 80. For the most part, we try to position things away from vehicle damage and the like. When we can’t, we usually use RMC.

As the inspector has the final say about the installation, we let them make the judgment call before we do the work if it’s questionable.

Lesp, in your case, your POCO is probably correct, but I would get the approval of your inspector first just to be safe.
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Old 05-27-2011, 09:33 AM   #7
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Schedule 40 or 80?


This is what I was going on.

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Originally Posted by lesp View Post
That's my understanding too, but it is unclear exactly when the conduit is "subject to damage". Does that mean any time the conduit is above ground? Or only certain circumstances -- like conduit on the front of a garage that could be driven into?

In my situation, the conduit runs vertically on the house siding from the meter socket to an LB where it enters the basement.
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Old 05-27-2011, 09:40 AM   #8
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Vertical doesn't specify whether it is up or down, just that it's not sideways. Could have meant it goes down.

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Old 05-27-2011, 10:12 AM   #9
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Good thought Will. I don't know why i took it to mean upwards.
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Old 05-27-2011, 11:58 AM   #10
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Schedule 40 or 80?


OP here. The underground feed goes up to the meter socket (which strangely is about 6' off the ground) and then the conduit travels back down to grade level before popping through the rim joist.

I don't have any 5-year old boys around, but it sounds like the Sch 80 is the better bet. What's your preferred way of cutting the stuff (short of investing in a dedicated PVC cutting tool)?
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Old 05-27-2011, 12:07 PM   #11
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Schedule 40 or 80?


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OP here. The underground feed goes up to the meter socket (which strangely is about 6' off the ground) and then the conduit travels back down to grade level before popping through the rim joist.

I don't have any 5-year old boys around, but it sounds like the Sch 80 is the better bet. What's your preferred way of cutting the stuff (short of investing in a dedicated PVC cutting tool)?
Hack saw, miter saw.
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Old 05-27-2011, 12:07 PM   #12
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Schedule 40 or 80?


Just about any kind of saw should work okay for pvc. I was using my circular saw to cut PVC when I was replacing my drainage pipes. I've also used a pipe cutter for copper pipes on schedule 40, but schedule 80 might be too thick - haven't tried it.

The circular saw is probably not the best choice, there are probably safer choices, but my excuse is that I had a lot of cuts and it was confined stinky crawlspace and I wasn't in any mood for spending the time and energy to use a hand saw for as many pieces as I needed to cut. Generally, a framing blade isn't really as fine as you want for plastic.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:43 PM   #13
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Schedule 40 or 80?


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Old 05-27-2011, 08:00 PM   #14
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Schedule 40 or 80?


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Old 05-27-2011, 08:50 PM   #15
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Schedule 40 or 80?


the first model on the market didn't sell so well: the sawzmost

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