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Old 07-09-2008, 09:34 PM   #1
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


I did a rewire of two lights so they share the same switch. I did everything right. Now Ive noticed that the lights are much brighter. What happened? No, nothings wrong Im just curious. Ive checked the wires for 220v because Ive heard this happens with 220v but I just get 120v. Did rewiring the common cause a better connection?

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Old 07-09-2008, 09:54 PM   #2
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


Maybe they were wired incorrectly (in series) before and you inadvertently fixed it.

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Old 07-10-2008, 12:06 PM   #3
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


Did you clean the globes, bulbs anything glass?
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Old 07-10-2008, 01:06 PM   #4
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Did you clean the globes, bulbs anything glass?
lol not really. I think its just tightened connections, this circuit shares a common for a furnace, 1 bedroom, a bathroom and a freezer. And after 7-8 years after a remodel. Connections can loosen up.
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:20 AM   #5
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Originally Posted by rgsgww View Post
lol not really. I think its just tightened connections, this circuit shares a common for a furnace, 1 bedroom, a bathroom and a freezer. And after 7-8 years after a remodel. Connections can loosen up.

Now that is a bit of load there if someone run the hair dryer in bathroom and the furance is running it will be surefire the breaker will trip no question asked there so down the road it will be wise to seprated them a bit when you get there.

Merci,Marc
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Old 07-11-2008, 09:11 AM   #6
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


Shouldn't the furnace have it's own dedicated line?
Maybe code doesn't require it, but sure makes sense to me. You wouldn't want to be in the cold because your hair dryer tripped the breaker.

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Old 07-11-2008, 01:42 PM   #7
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Shouldn't the furnace have it's own dedicated line?
Maybe code doesn't require it, but sure makes sense to me. You wouldn't want to be in the cold because your hair dryer tripped the breaker.

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It does actually. There are 2 breakers, both 15 amp, there is 14/3 wire. The red wire is connected to one 15 amp and the black to another 15 amp. In the junction box the red wire is connected to another line going to the furnace. And the black line goes to everything else. The furnace and everything else share a neutral. I would run its own line though.
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Old 07-11-2008, 01:44 PM   #8
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Originally Posted by frenchelectrican View Post
Now that is a bit of load there if someone run the hair dryer in bathroom and the furance is running it will be surefire the breaker will trip no question asked there so down the road it will be wise to seprated them a bit when you get there.

Merci,Marc
The furnace is on its own breaker, they just share a neutral. I would still run a new line to it and free up that neutral, those furnace motors send back alot of dirty electricity.
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:37 PM   #9
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


I assume you mean incandescent lamps.
If the voltage to your lamps is 120v + 10% you are shortening their service lifetime. A 10% increase in lamp voltage means you'll get 100x(1.1^[-12]) = 30% of normal service life.

If you're comfortable around electricity, I'd look for a bad connection on your neutral, which means heavy loads on one side of the 240v are seeing less than 120v and the loads on the other side of your neutral are seeing more than 120v. The total must add to 240v.
Any voltage drop across a bolted connection should be less than 30 millivolts.

If you're not comfortable around electricity, I recommend Googling the exact phrase

electrical safety

You should get 1.9 megahits.
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Old 07-11-2008, 02:54 PM   #10
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
I assume you mean incandescent lamps.
If the voltage to your lamps is 120v + 10% you are shortening their service lifetime. A 10% increase in lamp voltage means you'll get 100x(1.1^[-12]) = 30% of normal service life.

If you're comfortable around electricity, I'd look for a bad connection on your neutral, which means heavy loads on one side of the 240v are seeing less than 120v and the loads on the other side of your neutral are seeing more than 120v. The total must add to 240v.
Any voltage drop across a bolted connection should be less than 30 millivolts.

If you're not comfortable around electricity, I recommend Googling the exact phrase

electrical safety

You should get 1.9 megahits.

Thanks, I will check for a loose neutral in my service panels and a few junction boxes.
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Old 07-12-2008, 10:08 AM   #11
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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those furnace motors send back alot of dirty electricity.
Says who?
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Old 07-12-2008, 02:45 PM   #12
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Same lights much brighter after rewire?


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Says who?
Maybe not the new ones...mines old...some motors do that.

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