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-   -   Running wire along sill question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/running-wire-along-sill-question-152192/)

RISurfer 08-01-2012 06:08 AM

Running wire along sill question
 
I am running 4 wires along the house sill plate new construction. Is this to code? Can I staple the wires to the sill plate and the rim joists? Also for new construction kitchen receptacles can I install non-gfci if the circuit will be on a gfci breaker?will the inspector approve?

joecaption 08-01-2012 07:33 AM

Why would you not run the wires through a drilled hole in the floor joist? That way the wires would not be in the way later when someone wanted to finish the basement.

ddawg16 08-01-2012 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RISurfer (Post 978851)
I am running 4 wires along the house sill plate new construction. Is this to code? Can I staple the wires to the sill plate and the rim joists? Also for new construction kitchen receptacles can I install non-gfci if the circuit will be on a gfci breaker?will the inspector approve?

I believe per code, if the wire is running perpendicular to a joist, you have to drill a hole in the joist to run the wire.

Regardless..I think Joe is right....drill some holes and get those wires up out of the way. You want them at least 1.5" inboard to that it's unlikely a nail or screw will hit it.

On the outlets....yes, you can wire a TR outlet off the load side of a GFIC. It will be just as protected as the GFIC is.

andrew79 08-01-2012 09:54 AM

He asked of he could use a gfci breaker. Yes you can. Makes no difference if you use a breaker or plug. Needs to be 20a though.

md2lgyk 08-01-2012 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew79 (Post 978936)
He asked of he could use a gfci breaker. Yes you can. Makes no difference if you use a breaker or plug. Needs to be 20a though.

Actually, for the kitchen he'll need two of them.

RISurfer 08-01-2012 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 978923)
I believe per code, if the wire is running perpendicular to a joist, you have to drill a hole in the joist to run the wire.

Regardless..I think Joe is right....drill some holes and get those wires up out of the way. You want them at least 1.5" inboard to that it's unlikely a nail or screw will hit it.

On the outlets....yes, you can wire a TR outlet off the load side of a GFIC. It will be just as protected as the GFIC is.


I am helping the electrician do some of the work such as running the wires. He told me to run the wires along the sill plate on top of the concrete walls and then run them in to the stud bays. He didn't want me to run the wires through the floor joists. I figured this was one way of doing it.

joecaption 08-01-2012 12:48 PM

Is it faster to not have to drill the holes, yes.
Is someone going to have to go back and rerun the wires or add shims later if you do not drill the holes, most likely if you finish the basement.

hammerlane 08-01-2012 01:01 PM

Exposed "romex" smaller than 8AWG running at angles with joists in unfinished basements and crawl spaces must either be run thru bored holes in the joists or on running boards. 334.15C

RISurfer 08-01-2012 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerlane (Post 979046)
Exposed "romex" smaller than 8AWG running at angles with joists in unfinished basements and crawl spaces must either be run thru bored holes in the joists or on running boards. 334.15C

I'm using 14/2 and 12/2 should I bore holes through all the joists? Right now the wire runs parallel with the sill and adjacent to the joists.

electures 08-01-2012 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RISurfer (Post 978851)
I am running 4 wires along the house sill plate new construction. Is this to code? Can I staple the wires to the sill plate and the rim joists? Also for new construction kitchen receptacles can I install non-gfci if the circuit will be on a gfci breaker?will the inspector approve?

If you follow the letter of the code. No. However, for the 36+ years I have been wiring houses, it is commonly done. Just keep the wires up against the sill. As an inspector, I don't have a problem with it either. You may want to ask your local EI.

If you install GFI breakers, GFI receptacles are not necessary. You'll just have to run back to the panel everytime one trips.

stickboy1375 08-01-2012 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RISurfer (Post 978851)
I am running 4 wires along the house sill plate new construction. Is this to code?

Yes.


Quote:

Originally Posted by RISurfer (Post 978851)
Can I staple the wires to the sill plate and the rim joists?

Yes.


Quote:

Originally Posted by RISurfer (Post 978851)
Also for new construction kitchen receptacles can I install non-gfci if the circuit will be on a gfci breaker?will the inspector approve?

Yes.

Well, that was an easy one. :)

stickboy1375 08-01-2012 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electures (Post 979101)
If you follow the letter of the code. No.

Okay, lets duke it out, what code section would you call? :)

stickboy1375 08-01-2012 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerlane (Post 979046)
Exposed "romex" smaller than 8AWG running at angles with joists in unfinished basements and crawl spaces must either be run thru bored holes in the joists or on running boards. 334.15C

This is only if you are running on the BOTTOM of joist.... we are talking about the sill plate and rim board.

stickboy1375 08-01-2012 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 978882)
Why would you not run the wires through a drilled hole in the floor joist? That way the wires would not be in the way later when someone wanted to finish the basement.


And the wires would not be in the way... they would be stapled on a sill plate or rim board.

stickboy1375 08-01-2012 04:13 PM

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u...75/photo-5.jpg


These are wires stapled to a sill plate... this is not a violation, As they are NOT stapled to the bottom of a joist.


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