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nikeman 02-23-2012 08:00 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I am really close to having a shed built in my back yard and once it's built I want power ran to it. I would like an overhead light and probably 4 recepticals and of course a light switch. I am debating an exterior light also. Anyway, how hard of a project is this? Does anyone have a clue how much an electrician would charge to run the power out there for me? I can install the outlets and the the overhead light myself. Thanks!

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matt151617 02-23-2012 08:36 PM

It's fairly simple. You'll need to run conduit or bury UF wire; either will require digging a trench from wherever the power will be supplied from.

I recommend picking up an intro to home wiring book and doing it yourself. An electrician usually charges $70-90 an hour, plus the cost of materials. UF wire is somewhat expensive. It'll also take awhile to dig the ditch.

The wire will need to be on a breaker in the main panel, then run it into a sub-panel in the shed. Remember to isolate the ground from the neutral. Also, make sure the outlets are gfci protected.

nikeman 02-24-2012 02:39 PM

I was thinking I could buy all the parts and dig the trench myself but I know some people estimate a time by the job they are doing and it's pretty much just a fixed price even if it only takes 20 mins. Do I use my fuse box which is in my laundry room? I want it on its own circuit so I can turn that power off by itself if I ever need to. I have never looked in the box on the outside of my house but how hard is it to add a circuit from there? Also how deep should the trench be?

rrolleston 02-24-2012 02:47 PM

My first question would be what do you plan on running out there?

nikeman 02-24-2012 03:14 PM

I plan on getting so power saws and a small table saw. Just things like that, nothing big like a welder or anything. I'm thinking 5 outlets all together now. One above the workbench and then 1 near each corner of the shed. I have a dual 48" fluorescent light fixture that I plan on using as the overhead light.

I think it would be fun to wire up the shed myself so I can put the outlets and light switch exactly where I want them.

rrolleston 02-24-2012 03:23 PM

Some lights and just one saw at a time I would just run a 120v 20 amp feed. If you plan of doing something more in the future I would go at least 30amp 240v.

nikeman 02-24-2012 04:08 PM

I definitely want to add more then I need now so I won't regret it later on.

MisterSteve 02-24-2012 11:27 PM

I am currently working on a similar project of my own. Your needs sound pretty simple. How big is the shed and how far is it from your main panel?

rrolleston 02-25-2012 12:43 AM

I would go at least 240v and 30 amps. And use a generous size conduit.

matt151617 02-25-2012 09:32 AM

If you aren't sure what to do and where to run the circuit from, then hire an electrician. He can wire it up exactly how you want, just tell him what you plan on running out there. Save a bunch of money and dig the trench yourself.

I'm not really sure what you're talking about in regards to the fuse box in your laundry room and the box on the outside of your house. Is it actually a fuse box? Do you have multiple panels?

nikeman 02-25-2012 01:32 PM

I guess the one in my laundry room is just the circuit breaker and the actual panel is on the back of the house. I do not have the shed yet but have ordered the wood for it already. It will be a 12x16 and probably 50' from the panel if I can put it where I want it. If not it will only be about 30' from the panel.

As for the trench, I read that it needs to be 18" deep. My yard has a lot of trees and therefore a lot of roots in the ground. Any tips on making the digging part as simple as possible?

rrolleston 02-25-2012 01:37 PM

18" if in conduit 24" without conduit and 12" if gfci protected.

nikeman 02-25-2012 01:57 PM

I see the I can rent a trench digger from home depot but I still think the tree roots will be an issue. The ground is pretty solid back there as well. With the conduit can I only make 90 degree turns or can I zigzag around roots as needed?

Dierte 02-25-2012 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nikeman
I see the I can rent a trench digger from home depot but I still think the tree roots will be an issue. The ground is pretty solid back there as well. With the conduit can I only make 90 degree turns or can I zigzag around roots as needed?

A good walk behind trencher will have no problems with roots

Yoyizit 02-26-2012 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nikeman (Post 862907)
I see the I can rent a trench digger from home depot but I still think the tree roots will be an issue. The ground is pretty solid back there as well. With the conduit can I only make 90 degree turns or can I zigzag around roots as needed?

You can search what percent of the roots you can sever without endangering the health of the trees.
Digging by hand and going under the roots is about the nastiest and time-consuming job you can take on. A garden hose with good water pressure makes this easier but it leaves a muddy mess.


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