DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Electrical (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/)
-   -   Running new(up to code) ground wire & protection. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/running-new-up-code-ground-wire-protection-74780/)

MikeSF 06-27-2010 01:09 PM

Running new(up to code) ground wire & protection.
 
I recently replaced my old FPE breaker with a newer updated one simply due to the additional circuits I would be adding to the house (namely solar panels), under the instruction of a friend of a friend who's an electrician, he told me because I replaced it (and it's an obvious replacement) the ground needs to be brought up to code unless I want it to be flagged by the inspector.

Currently it's a 100amp panel, and the current ground consisted of a #6 wire being strung up to and attached to a cold water pipe that's somewhat close to the panel (maybe 10 feet), I was told that I need to connect a ground within 5 feet of where the cold water enters the ground, as well as connect to the house size of the gas lines as well (I don't get it, but whatever), and the wire needs to be at least #4 which I have plenty of (also need to hammer ground rods for a 2nd.. but whatever for now).

Since he left for vacation I can't get ahold of him however I'm wondering what sort of protection needs to be done for the ground wire as the cold is on the other side of the garage. Do I need to run the single wire in conduit? or can I drill through the studs (ala romex) and run the wire through there (even though it's not romex #4) or can the wire be exposed (stapled) because it's not carrying a load?

Thanks.

xxPaulCPxx 06-27-2010 02:28 PM

They sell ground wire at the big boxes already wrapped in flexible aluminumn sheathing, in 25' and 100' lenths. You need to have a continuous connection (no breaks) between your panel and your ground.

Your cold water pip isn't a true ground, but keep that connection as it does need to be bonded to. A pair of ground rods will be your true ground.

brric 06-27-2010 03:48 PM

You do not need sheathing on the ground wire to the water line. The water pipe ground is far superior to any two grounding rods- but you should do both.

Speedy Petey 06-27-2010 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric (Post 462021)
You do not need sheathing on the ground wire to the water line. The water pipe ground is far superior to any two grounding rods- but you should do both.

Agree. :thumbsup:

MikeSF 06-27-2010 05:31 PM

Thanks for the reply.

So just to make things clear, ground only needs to be stapled to the rafters to get to the water pipe? (unfinished basement area).

And yeah, I know two ground rods are additional, and thanks to San Francisco code is a necessity.

brric 06-27-2010 05:44 PM

There are no rafters in a basement. You would be better off drilling the floor joists to accomodate the wire.

nap 06-27-2010 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeSF (Post 462066)

And yeah, I know two ground rods are additional, and thanks to San Francisco code is a necessity.

If the water pipe is your only grounding electrode, any place the follows the NEC requires at least 1 rod in addition to the water pipe BUT in addition to the rod itself, the rod must show less than 25 ohms resistance to Earth or a 2nd rod must be installed so unless a person wants to go to the trouble of a resistance test, everybody just drives 2 rods in addition to the water pipe.

so, most of the country would require 2 rods, not just San Francisco.

xxPaulCPxx 06-27-2010 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeSF (Post 462066)
So just to make things clear, ground only needs to be stapled to the rafters to get to the water pipe? (unfinished basement area).

That is correct. Though carrying no current, they should still be treated like romex in that you protect the cable and keep it from been worn away by abrasion. That's less a concern with a single strand of thick copper, but is a concern with thinner stranded type that is much easier to handle and pull.

Jim Port 06-27-2010 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx (Post 461993)
Your cold water pipe isn't a true ground, but keep that connection as it does need to be bonded to. A pair of ground rods will be your true ground.

The water line ground is the primary. The rods would be the supplemental ground.

xxPaulCPxx 06-28-2010 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 462168)
The water line ground is the primary. The rods would be the supplemental ground.

It is primary as it is a better ground, with more surface area and longer contact surface than a 5/8" rod... until your water company comes out and replaces it with plastic pipe.

Oops! Hope no one gets the impression that it's OK to just ground off your water pipe. Right about now is when alot of the post WWII baby boom housing is getting their copper pipe replaced due to corrosion from soil contact under the slabs.

brric 06-28-2010 12:18 PM

Why don't you explain to us how effective you think a pair of rods is for grounding?

xxPaulCPxx 06-28-2010 12:51 PM

Compared to what?

A disconnected cold water pipe? A UFER? 3 or more Ground rods? Ground rods driven at a 45 degree angle? Ground plate?

brric 06-28-2010 01:24 PM

Two standard 5/8" x 8' galvanized ground rods.

xxPaulCPxx 06-28-2010 02:03 PM

Why don't you explain to us how effective you think a pair of rods is for grounding?


Compared to what?

Two standard 5/8" x 8' galvanized ground rods.


You want me to compare what I suggested to what I suggested?

Jim Port 06-28-2010 02:23 PM

Going backwards in the posts, this might be why Brric is asking about the ground rods and their function.

Quote:

Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx (Post 461993)
Your cold water pip isn't a true ground, but keep that connection as it does need to be bonded to. A pair of ground rods will be your true ground.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 PM.