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Old 12-01-2010, 01:02 AM   #1
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Running electrical lines behind Barricade wall panels


Does anyone know how easy this is? Can it be done after the panels are in place? Or does it have to be done while putting up the panels?

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Old 12-01-2010, 01:21 AM   #2
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Running electrical lines behind Barricade wall panels


what is a barricade wall panel?

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Old 12-01-2010, 09:28 AM   #3
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Running electrical lines behind Barricade wall panels


Sorry, I meant to include a link: http://www.ovrx.com/basement-wall-panels.html
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Old 12-01-2010, 11:30 AM   #4
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Running electrical lines behind Barricade wall panels


well, just not really sure. It appears to be designed to run a horizontal branch above the wall and feed any devices from the top of the wall using the channels in the foam. Not sure how large the channels are in the foam and how accurate a worker may be. It might be easier to fish the wall after installation if not using a conduit system.

Another thought comes to mind and that is; is NM acceptable for this types of installation? NM is not allowed in damp locations nor is it allowed to be in a channel cut into concrete. Now, this installation does not include either of those conditions, exactly... but to me, provide a very similar environment. The foam is a vapor barrier so any moisture in the concrete will cause the NM to be in a damp environment (concrete stays damp for decades, even if you do not consider any possible water infiltration from outside) and although not in a channel in the concrete, it is as close to that type of situation without being exactly that. I believe the use of NMC would overcome both of those concerns.

It appears to be thick enough so the minimum of 1 1/4" from the edge of a stud limitation would be properly respected.

One thing to note though is it specifically states: Pre-cut wire chase. + run your conduit directly from the ceiling. With that, I don't know if they are implying their research has concluded you must use a conduit system or just their choice of terms.

Obviously if a conduit system was used, it would have to be pre-installed.

I would suggest speaking with the local electrical inspector to get his take on it before doing much of anything. Every time a new product comes out there seems to be a thousand different positions on the thing and how any rules are applied. Since the inspector has almost unfettered control over the final product, I believe it would be prudent to get his input as early in the situation as possible.
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