Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-27-2013, 03:28 AM   #16
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


From the pictures I saw, especially the full 50 gallon trash can upstairs serving as a collection bucket for a roof leak, and all the obvious water damaged plaster/lath walls and ceilings up there, it's obvious the roof has been leaking for YEARS in multiple locations, by now the water has done so much damage up there I'd bet if the plaster was removed they would find almost every roof rafter has rot, and the walls too.The top floor floor certainly as well.
Unfortunately once a building's roof is breached and left that way, it's pretty much the beginning of the end of the building, those softwood studs, lath, joists, rafters and floorboards start decaying amazingly fast and once it starts it proceeds rapidly.
I remember an abandoned building in NYC that had a fire which burned the roof off in one area, they cement blocked the windows and closed it up, but a tree grew up on the top floor that had a trunk that was 6" in diameter. The weight of a brick slid across the floor was enough for it to fall through the floorboards.
I don't see this building being renovated, the costs are too high and they could only fit a small number of say, apartments in there, and people will only pay so much for rent.
But if anyone wants to save it, someone had better deal with that roof ASAP and stop the water from coming in before it really is too late if it isn't already. Someone with a couple of 5 gallon cans of trowel consistancy tar and a roll of tar paper could probably temporarily patch most if not all of the obvious leaking spots and buy it some more time, another year or so maybe.

Once the roof deck and floors have rot it would likely have to be gutted to the bare brick shell and all the interior walls, floors, electrical, windows, plumbing, heating, stairs etc etc would all have to be replaced.


Last edited by RWolff; 01-27-2013 at 03:31 AM.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 03:38 AM   #17
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
But I would contact the local electrical inspectors and
ask there advise.
I wouldn't suggest inviting trouble by even contacting them! they get wind of all those roof leaks with the 50 gallon trashcan full of rainwater upstairs, live power to meters and boxes, celing plaster caving in along with apparantly occupied businesses on the ground floor and you are begging for an immediate vacate order.

The only time to call them is when the owner wants to do a renovation and needs to get permits and all that.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 10:58 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oso954 View Post
Here is a link to what I believe is the applicable Ohio Code for you.
http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/4101%3A1-34

Read it and Ask Planning which of the sections they will enforce on you if you buy the building and repair/change the Occupancy.
Note that 3401.5 (and sub paragraphs) are seismic evaluations/retrofits.
Other Killers can be fire exits, sprinklers, etc.

The bill to fix the electrical in that building will probably cost you more than the purchase price.
I would assume that alot of the outdated things like electrical and seismic withstandability (If that is a word) would be grandfathered in a historical building like this (1892). If not, I'd imagine alot more of East Liverpool would be abandoned. There is a fire escape attached to the building next door, which is included and is attached on the upper levels. Again, I have never even seen this building in real life to evaluate it.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 11:22 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
From the pictures I saw, especially the full 50 gallon trash can upstairs serving as a collection bucket for a roof leak, and all the obvious water damaged plaster/lath walls and ceilings up there, it's obvious the roof has been leaking for YEARS in multiple locations, by now the water has done so much damage up there I'd bet if the plaster was removed they would find almost every roof rafter has rot, and the walls too.The top floor floor certainly as well.
Unfortunately once a building's roof is breached and left that way, it's pretty much the beginning of the end of the building, those softwood studs, lath, joists, rafters and floorboards start decaying amazingly fast and once it starts it proceeds rapidly.
I remember an abandoned building in NYC that had a fire which burned the roof off in one area, they cement blocked the windows and closed it up, but a tree grew up on the top floor that had a trunk that was 6" in diameter. The weight of a brick slid across the floor was enough for it to fall through the floorboards.
I don't see this building being renovated, the costs are too high and they could only fit a small number of say, apartments in there, and people will only pay so much for rent.
But if anyone wants to save it, someone had better deal with that roof ASAP and stop the water from coming in before it really is too late if it isn't already. Someone with a couple of 5 gallon cans of trowel consistancy tar and a roll of tar paper could probably temporarily patch most if not all of the obvious leaking spots and buy it some more time, another year or so maybe.

Once the roof deck and floors have rot it would likely have to be gutted to the bare brick shell and all the interior walls, floors, electrical, windows, plumbing, heating, stairs etc etc would all have to be replaced.
The topic is getting a little bit off of electrical here. First, I read through and looked at all 8 pages of pictures (multiple times), and I can say that the picture with the trash can collecting rainwater is in the Lowe building next door (fire escape outside window). The Lowe building needs most work, and certainly a new roof over it; it is included in the sale and attached on the upper levels. The main building is pretty solid from what I've seen. I know the plaster damage is bad, but this is an amazing old building with beautiful archetecture, and I can't bear the thought that it might be left to fully rot away. It has been a centerpiece in the historical Diamond area in downtown East Liverpool since it was built. I know no one else plans to save it, that's why I'd love to. Maybe I'm trying to jump into this too fast, and maybe I'll get in over my head, but I think it is still saveable.

I'm sure the electrical, plumbing, and all will need work. One of the first things that I would do would be to tar and patch the roof. Looks like the roof access (Small pink steps in one picture, I think) has been blocked off. If the rafters are too bad, they could be sprayed for mold/mildew and piggy-backed to new rafters for extra support. The sheathing is probably rotted too. One thing, I must qoute www.oldhouseguy.com in saying, never, ever, ever, replace historical wooden windows. If this building is ever mine, those will be restored with new glazing, wood putty/epoxy, and paint. New windows would kill the look of the building. I'd try to save the Plaster and Lathe, but I'm sure the exterior walls would need gutted for plumbing/electrical, and I am willing to be there is little to no insulation in any exterior walls, or even the roof.

Sorry for the long responce, please bear with my ranting
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 11:32 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
I wouldn't suggest inviting trouble by even contacting them! they get wind of all those roof leaks with the 50 gallon trashcan full of rainwater upstairs, live power to meters and boxes, celing plaster caving in along with apparantly occupied businesses on the ground floor and you are begging for an immediate vacate order.

The only time to call them is when the owner wants to do a renovation and needs to get permits and all that.
The current owner will never renovate it, he will leave it to rot. I wouldn't contact in inspector either, because they would tell me everything I already know. The building has a total of four storefronts currently, liberty tax occupying the main store front. The two on the side are empty, and the Lowe building store front was an attorneys office until 2010 or so. So all that is left is liberty tax. The rent from any businesses would generate some repair money, but not alot. The back section of the building could be divided into two or three apartments (It's seperate). The Lowe building repairs would be years down the road, because it probably needs new floor joists on the fourth, maybe even the third floor (Third floor had the Trash bucket full of water). I always imagined living in the large area above the main portion of the building (above Liberty Tax and one of the empty store fronts), but I always dream big.
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 11:45 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


I don't know if you guys have even seen the exterior of the building yet, so I'll post a link to the first of the eight pages of pictures to it. I only posted a link to the third page at the beginning of this thread. BTW, some "ghostbusters" went through this building in 2009, and posted their video of it on youtube, called "Ghosts in the Diamond House". This is a link to the Historical Society's webpage:

http://www.eastliverpoolhistoricalso...20Building.htm
mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 12:30 PM   #22
Architectural Sculptor
 
RWolff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA, Midwest
Posts: 765
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by mt999999 View Post
The topic is getting a little bit off of electrical here.
It is, why don't I move my response to the construction folder tonight and we can chat more about this there, because this whole thing is right up my alley, I am also a member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

http://www.preservationnation.org

Anticipate a post in that construction folder (I think that's the best place for this topic but I'll look) later tonight.
RWolff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 12:58 PM   #23
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,559
Rewards Points: 2,014
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Most people on this electrical forum don't read the other forums, I don't think.
__________________
I am a lawyer, but not your lawyer. And who cares anyways? We're here to talk construction. This is DIY advice, not legal advice.
mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 02:39 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: East Liverpool, OH
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Residential Knife Switch Electrical Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by RWolff View Post
It is, why don't I move my response to the construction folder tonight and we can chat more about this there, because this whole thing is right up my alley, I am also a member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

http://www.preservationnation.org

Anticipate a post in that construction folder (I think that's the best place for this topic but I'll look) later tonight.
I could also go on about this all night. Speaking of old crumbling buildings, the former Sherwin Williams Paint Store in East Liverpool is now slated for demolition. If you want to see a bad building, the roof on the back of that one has caved in. I plan on asking for a tour before they demo it, so I can get some pictures. I'll look for your post later tonight.

mt999999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
3 pole, electrical panel, knife switch, knob and tube, old electrical


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Residential Electrical Panel Load. Irshad Electrical 27 02-11-2012 12:57 PM
Mobile Home Electrical Panel Replacement rrolleston Electrical 2 01-28-2012 06:27 PM
Electrical Panel - Ground Bar/Wiring and Safety cfreak Electrical 31 09-11-2011 09:10 AM
electrical plug and switch Linda Patterson Electrical 3 05-10-2010 07:55 PM
Fitting dimmer switch to old electrical wiring hugomax69 Electrical 0 01-29-2010 08:40 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.