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Old 01-20-2009, 07:34 AM   #1
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Well, it's finally happening. I convinced my wife that we need a new TV, and a 42" plasma fit the bill.

I have an older house but have upgraded 80% of the electrical. Unfortunatly, the room where the tv is going is the only room in the house that hasn't been upgraded.

The living room currently sports 3 prong ungrounded receps that are GFCI protected at the breaker.

All of the tv's I have had in the past have a 2 blade plug on them, so I would assume that they aren't required to have an equiptment ground so it's not an issue. But with the new one, I want to make sure I protect it.

I have the ability to upgrade some of the receps in the room easily, but not all of them. I plan to upgrade the one where the tv will be as soon as I can (maybe a few weeks - there are other things that take priority). Will it be okay until then to use it the way it is? Is a surge protector going to do anything for me without a ground?


Also, is there any benifet to having the tv and the rest of the stuff (dvd, surround, etc) on a dedicated circuit?

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Last edited by CowboyAndy; 01-20-2009 at 07:36 AM.
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Old 01-20-2009, 08:22 AM   #2
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Three prong receptacles should not be installed on ungrounded circuits. You can get away temporarily by putting a hard-to-remove label on each reading "No Equipment Ground".

You can string a ground wire, exposed along the baseboard if needed, to connect otherwise ungrounded receptacles to a known ground such as a water pipe without any all plastic sections in the way down to where it exits the house. Connecting to the frame of your main electrical panel is better for a ground. You can string a ground wire among your electronic components, screwed into the metal chassis of each, with the far end connected to a known ground. Without properly wired 3 prong receptacles you can use one of those three prong plug to two prong receptacle adapters, connecting your hand strung ground wire to the little grounding lug using Erector set or similar bolts and nuts. This latter is usually although not always as good as connecting the ground wire to the chassis of the piece of equipment.

GFCI units help protect people from electrocution, but do not suppress hum and noise that may be suppressed by grounding the equipment.

Most surge suppressors require a ground.

Here are the benefits of a dedicated circuit for electronics:
1. If you install a built in surge suppressor at or near your electrical panel, you only need one as opposed to one per circuit.
2. If the dedicated circuit is new and you can inspect it to be sure all the connections are proper and tight. (You can also inspect existing circuits but this may be more time consuming.)
3. If the existing circuits are shared by too many other electrical devices in different rooms or don't have enough convenient receptacles. A dedicated circuit without a surger/noise suppressor may or may not offer freedom from electrical noise induced by some older washing machines, vacuum cleaners etc. elsewhere in the house and this may depend on whether the offending device is on the "other side of the 120/240 volt lines".

You do realize that plasma TV's give off more heat, consume more electricity, and weigh more than other similarly sized and shaped TV's (namely LCD's)


Last edited by AllanJ; 01-20-2009 at 08:45 AM.
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Old 01-20-2009, 08:59 AM   #3
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
Three prong receptacles should not be installed on ungrounded circuits. You can get away temporarily by putting a hard-to-remove label on each reading "No Equipment Ground".

You can string a ground wire, exposed along the baseboard if needed, to connect otherwise ungrounded receptacles to a known ground such as a water pipe without any all plastic sections in the way down to where it exits the house. Connecting to the frame of your main electrical panel is better for a ground. You can string a ground wire among your electronic components, screwed into the metal chassis of each, with the far end connected to a known ground. Without properly wired 3 prong receptacles you can use one of those three prong plug to two prong receptacle adapters, connecting your hand strung ground wire to the little grounding lug using Erector set or similar bolts and nuts. This latter is usually although not always as good as connecting the ground wire to the chassis of the piece of equipment.

GFCI units help protect people from electrocution, but do not suppress hum and noise that may be suppressed by grounding the equipment.

Most surge suppressors require a ground.

Here are the benefits of a dedicated circuit for electronics:
1. If you install a built in surge suppressor at or near your electrical panel, you only need one as opposed to one per circuit.
2. If the dedicated circuit is new and you can inspect it to be sure all the connections are proper and tight. (You can also inspect existing circuits but this may be more time consuming.)
3. If the existing circuits are shared by too many other electrical devices in different rooms or don't have enough convenient receptacles. A dedicated circuit without a surger/noise suppressor may or may not offer freedom from electrical noise induced by some older washing machines, vacuum cleaners etc. elsewhere in the house and this may depend on whether the offending device is on the "other side of the 120/240 volt lines".

You do realize that plasma TV's give off more heat, consume more electricity, and weigh more than other similarly sized and shaped TV's (namely LCD's)
First of all, you CAN put 3 prong receps on an ungrounded circuits, so long as they are gfci protected and labeled as such, which they are.

I think that you wrote a big long post for no reason... all I need to know is if it will be okay without a ground for a few weeks until I have the time to rewire the recep.


Also, Plasmas have come along way in the last few years. The one I bought consumes 350 watts, compared to 275 from its lcd brother (same size, same brand) and weighs 26 lbs.
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Old 01-20-2009, 10:01 AM   #4
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Requirements for Plasma TV


I cant see why it would be a problem.
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Old 01-20-2009, 10:36 AM   #5
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Make sure you upgrade soon!

Surge suppressors will work with no ground if they have "l-n" protection. Basically, a mov across hot and neutral. You need a proper ground to be safe...with no ground there is a possibility of hurting the tv. Very small, but possible.

With no ground...you will have a "floating ground" on the case. You may see voltages of 60-120 on the cases. Once the coax is installed the current may flow through the coax...making hum and visual distortion. You might get a light shock when you touch the coax port on the tv and the jack.

Last edited by rgsgww; 01-20-2009 at 10:39 AM.
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Old 01-20-2009, 11:24 AM   #6
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Requirements for Plasma TV


I went with a 42" LCD that uses 98-104 watts as measured
The Plasma's used too much
I guess 375w isn't extremely bad, but it's 3x what my TV uses
One we looked at used 500w

They say 40-42" is the size breaker & larger TV's Plasma has a better pic

I also bought a UPS & my TV, DVD etc are plugged into it
Relatively cheap added insurance for a big cost item
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Old 01-20-2009, 11:27 AM   #7
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Requirements for Plasma TV


don't forget the wall mount I just wall mounted our TV, and want to know how do you have surge protection with a wall mount, where the TV is plugged directly into a wall receptacle.
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Old 01-20-2009, 11:48 AM   #8
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Requirements for Plasma TV


They do have different sized surge protectors that will plug in
Depending upon the wall possibly build a cubby to hold a UPS or other surge? If there is a closet behind the TV I would install a pass thru for power cord & put the UPS in the closet

They also make whole house surge that connects at the panel

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Old 01-20-2009, 01:32 PM   #9
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Good name brand plasmas(not Vizio crap) are better than any LCD. You get darker blacks, not greys. They do not suffer from fast motion artifacts like all LCD's do. We avoid doing LCD's other than in Kitchens, Bathrooms, and if it will be smaller than 37".
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:07 PM   #10
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Requirements for Plasma TV


You can get a Pass & Seymour/ On-Q/Legrand series surge supression duplex receptacle from Lowes or an electric supply house. $30-45.
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:21 PM   #11
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Requirements for Plasma TV


My plasma uses 680 watts, but that is what you get with a 60".
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:55 PM   #12
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
don't forget the wall mount I just wall mounted our TV, and want to know how do you have surge protection with a wall mount, where the TV is plugged directly into a wall receptacle.

Just install a surge suppression receptacle below the tv and connect the tv outlet to the "load" side.
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Old 01-21-2009, 06:01 AM   #13
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Requirements for Plasma TV


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I went with a 42" LCD that uses 98-104 watts as measured
The Plasma's used too much
I guess 375w isn't extremely bad, but it's 3x what my TV uses
One we looked at used 500w

They say 40-42" is the size breaker & larger TV's Plasma has a better pic

I also bought a UPS & my TV, DVD etc are plugged into it
Relatively cheap added insurance for a big cost item
What purpose does the UPS serve?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
don't forget the wall mount I just wall mounted our TV, and want to know how do you have surge protection with a wall mount, where the TV is plugged directly into a wall receptacle.
We're not wall mounting it, so thats not an issue. Going on our mantle for now on its stand, and as soon as we have the extra cash getting one of those entertainment centers with the built in mount.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg C View Post
Good name brand plasmas(not Vizio crap) are better than any LCD. You get darker blacks, not greys. They do not suffer from fast motion artifacts like all LCD's do. We avoid doing LCD's other than in Kitchens, Bathrooms, and if it will be smaller than 37".
Thats why we went with the plasma. Unfortunatly, we are not in the ideal financial situation to go with a "top of the line" brand like sony or panasonic. We got a Dynex, which is Best Buys "house brand". I did alot of research and read alot of reviews. Spend hours in best buy comparing tvs, and the desicion was that the picture (to us) was just as goos as the more expensive ones, and the reviews on the one we got were mostly positive with a few bad ones, but those are usually people who got lemons out of the box.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:51 PM   #14
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Requirements for Plasma TV


The problem with cheep TV's is that once out of warrantee, you cannot get them fixed. People like Vizio, Westinghouse, Dynex, Insignia (which is BB inhouse brand) buy components where ever they can at time of production. March they may use LG boards, April Samsung, etc. They do not have service manuals because they do not want to fix them.

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