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Old 03-08-2013, 10:14 PM   #1
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


I want to put two coaxial jacks and one phone jack in a corner that's currently solid concrete. I already drilled a diagonal 1" hole from inside the closet, shown in the photo, but I want to extend the wall rather than cut away more concrete for two low voltage boxes in that 9-1/2" space. How deep should the hollow area be? The coaxial cable will probably have to bend when it exits the current hole in the wall. I don't think I want to use right angle adapters.
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:25 PM   #2
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


You don't need a box for coax/phone.

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Old 03-08-2013, 10:34 PM   #3
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


I know but I want things neat and when I sell the apartment I want to be able to say how many jacks I have. If I decide not to use one, I can just unplug the cable and it looks decent. And jacks make it easier to paint, lay carpet, etc. And I want the wall plates to screw into the standard things that they screw into.

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Old 03-08-2013, 10:41 PM   #4
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


You will not be able to get a box in that concrete. Just use a panhead Masonry http://www.menards.com/main/building...ete/c-8928.htm
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:41 PM   #5
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


Go to your local big box store and ask for Low Volt Rings.
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:58 PM   #6
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


"I want to extend the wall rather than cut away more concrete for two low voltage boxes" and I was wondering if there's a recommended minimum depth for a low voltage ring. I have to decided how much to offset the new drywall from the current wall.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:10 PM   #7
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


Your still working on this How does a guy get a steel EMT body? . I would say take the best route, and make it work. The problem is, you are dealing with support columns at the corners, which means you probably would be best to pull the wall up and out, so that you have at least a inch or two to allow conduit to sweep around the corners.

Bad thing is, you will loose five inches aprox. on each wall, which at the end, will make the room at least a foot smaller wall to wall.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:27 PM   #8
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


There's a different challenge with each turn of the cable. There won't be EMT in this corner or through the closet and the 1" diameter hole is already drilled. A couple of inches offset is probably about right for the new wall. I'll read the specs of some low volt rings and make sure I add a little more depth than I need when I build the wall. Actually, the bend radius of the coax probably requires more depth than the box. I'll assume quad shield.

...actually, the hole is about 4" deep and dusty so maybe I'll put EMT in the hole to keep things clean when changing cable.

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Old 03-08-2013, 11:41 PM   #9
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


I just thought of something. Instead of going through all of these headaches, and having to add false walls, go with baseboards, that incorporate the raceways for lv & line voltage in there. You can get them pre-made, or have them manufactured by a local shop & have wood placed over the face, so you do not have just the metal face painted.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:51 PM   #10
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Required in-wall space for low voltage box


I know, trust me, I considered that. I have to go around doors. Some people can run cable through door frames but my door frames are attached to the plaster and mesh walls and I've been told it's not an option for me. I know about cove molding, crown raceway, etc. I'm too far into this and I have a firm plan that I'm sticking to that hardly changes day to day anymore, starting tomorrow.

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