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-   -   Replacing Bathroom Wall Mounted Light Fixtures (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/replacing-bathroom-wall-mounted-light-fixtures-78050/)

Bob1946 08-06-2010 02:07 AM

Replacing Bathroom Wall Mounted Light Fixtures
 
4 Attachment(s)
Our house was built in 1883 and I am trying to replace the wall mounted light bars in the master bath. I've run into two problems. The "end" or left junction box seems loose in the wall and the right junction box (where the wiring feeds to the left box) was never installed as there is a stud to the right of the opening where the box should go. I am guessing but I suppose the light bars (8 light) may have been considered the junction box so it passed inspection. They were supported by molly bolts in the sheet rock. I need to know 1) do I need a junction box where it's going to be blocked by the stud and 2) any idea on what to do about the loose box?

The fixtures I want to put up weigh around 10-15 pounds each and mount on a circular plate that should attach to a box. I got one up in another bathroom and it seems to be sturdy enough. Any suggestions would be appreciated. If necessary, I guess I could call an electrical contractor and just get it done but I'm retired and really don't want to spend the money.

Another thought I've had is to mount a decorative wood panel to the sheet rock at the places where the current holes are and secure it to the studs.
Any thoughts on that?

Thanks in advance.

Bob

Proby 08-06-2010 08:19 AM

What is that blue thing that wires are coming thru?

In the opening with no box you can install a pancake box. Since the stud is over to the side you will only get (1) screw into it thru the factory holes in the box. What I would recommend is to drill a second hole in the box making sure that both holes are over the beefy part of the stud (aim for the middle). Then I would use (2) small 1/4" lag bolts to hold the box to the stud.

As for the other box that is loose, I would try to remove it and take a picture. It looks like an old work box that was hacked up. Since I am not sure what it is I can't give a good response.

57_Hemi 08-06-2010 08:30 AM

these new fixtures of yours.... do they mount only from 1 location ? (in the middle I take it)

If so, even if u mount the fixture will you not have your other "loose" junction box showing afterwards?

I guess you'll have to do some patch work on the wall regardless. If thats the case maybe eliminate then fill in/patch up the "loose" junction box area and if you can make the other hole near the stud a bit bigger (just enough to squeaze in a new octagonal box in) then u could securely mount it sideways on the existing stud and support it there.....then patch up the existing area around the new box.

OR......They make "pancake boxes". They are approx 1/2" in thickness and you could fasten 1 of those to the stud were ur wire is and go from there.....

hope this sort of helps.... :)

57_Hemi 08-06-2010 08:36 AM

btw... Was that a typo or was the actual year 1883 that you say your home was built in ?

(that wiring was definetly done after.... maybe 100yrs after)....lol

just thought I'd ask :)

Proby 08-06-2010 09:51 AM

57_Hemi, I got the impression that he was hanging two separate lights on two separate boxes. I don't think he is trying to span one light across two boxes.

57_Hemi 08-06-2010 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Proby (Post 481331)
57_Hemi, I got the impression that he was hanging two separate lights on two separate boxes. I don't think he is trying to span one light across two boxes.

:oops: ur right !! ....... a total mis-read on my part


In that case try to re-fasten the loose box best u can and use the pancake for the other side and fasten to the stud....... The more support the merrier..... especially considering the fact u say the fixtures weigh 10-15lbs each.... :eek:

fill us in :)

Jim Port 08-06-2010 10:50 AM

PRoby,

That blue item in the pic is a NM cable connector. IMO it is a terrible design. They are a pain to remove from the KO and you need a channel lock to set the wedge clamp on the sheath.

Here is one.
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...t:429,r:10,s:0

Bob1946 08-06-2010 01:59 PM

Thanks for all of the responses. I don't think a 1/2" deep box will work because of the bundle of wiring that has to fit in it. Do I absolutely need a box at the hole by the stud? I could get a wood shim in there and attach the fixture mounting bracket with a couple of 3" lag screws into the stud on the right and a drywall anchor on the left. Yes, I know it's a hokey solution but it would work - maybe.

I'm not thrilled with having connections in the wall but it will be on a GFR circuit.

What do you think about using a wood "decorative" plate to catch at least 2 studs around the existing openings and attaching the fixture mounting bracket to the plate? Hokey solution #2 - grin.

The house was built in 1983 although as I dig into it I think the builder was trained in 1883.

Proby 08-06-2010 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob1946 (Post 481476)
Thanks for all of the responses. I don't think a 1/2" deep box will work because of the bundle of wiring that has to fit in it.

Usually we would fold those wires up neatly in the fixture's canopy.

Quote:

Do I absolutely need a box at the hole by the stud?
Yes, in this case it's not only code, but it's a safety concern as well. You want the box to contain any arcing or sparking, instead of letting it get into the hollow wall space.

Bob1946 08-06-2010 02:28 PM

What do you think of the wood plate on top of the drywall idea? I could use a 1/2" plate, install the pancake box and have plenty of room for the wiring and adequate support for the fixtures. The fixture canopy has virtually no room in it for the wiring - Chinese special from Home Depot.


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