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Old 02-01-2014, 10:16 PM   #1
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


Hi everyone

I removed a chandelier and do not want to replace with a fixture as the home is being sold.

Is it ok if I tape the ends of the wires with electrical tape and leave them alone?
Is there a safety issue by doing that.

Thank you.

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Old 02-01-2014, 10:23 PM   #2
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


The correct way is wirenuts and a blank cover.

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Old 02-01-2014, 10:37 PM   #3
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


Thanks very much Techy. I will put wire nuts on and a cover.
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Old 02-04-2014, 06:53 PM   #4
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


Why not just install an inexpensive (cheap) light so there is no question that the circuit works?
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:02 PM   #5
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


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Why not just install an inexpensive (cheap) light so there is no question that the circuit works?
Why? It was probably addressed in the sale. I've been hired out many times to remove fixtures with no replacements...
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Old 02-05-2014, 04:55 AM   #6
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


Code requires a wall switch controlled lighting outlet, so you can't leave the room with nothing.

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Old 02-05-2014, 05:24 AM   #7
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Code requires a wall switch controlled lighting outlet, so you can't leave the room with nothing.

Mark
The outlet will still be there, it just will not have a fixture on it.
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Old 02-05-2014, 06:55 AM   #8
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The outlet will still be there, it just will not have a fixture on it.
Jim,

Respectfully, a covered JB does not meet the definition of an outlet. An outlet is, "A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment." No current IS or can be taken from a covered JB and it is not an outlet.

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Old 02-05-2014, 07:01 AM   #9
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


I have passed numerous inspections by covering the switched outlet required by the NEC with a blank plate.
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Old 02-05-2014, 07:58 AM   #10
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I have passed numerous inspections by covering the switched outlet required by the NEC with a blank plate.
I've said many times that passing inspection does not mean that the installation meets the NEC requirements. A good example is that about 98% of the new homes I work in around here have all the EGCs in a box cut to about 3 inches long and twisted with the one left about 6 inches long and then placed in a steel ground crimp and mashed with side-cutters. This is two code violations; not enough free conductor at the box and connector not installed in accordance with the Listing instructions. However, this passes inspection every time. I'm currently trying to get inspectors to change this. It's a PIA when you have to rework those grounds for any reason.

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Old 02-05-2014, 08:19 AM   #11
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


I don't think the intent of the NEC was to allow a switch in the basement to be the means to turn a second floor lighting outlet on/off, but that is legal as well.

"The intent of the code" is a bogus argument IMO. The code is very specific and if the intent was to require a fixture or receptacle, it would state just that.
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:30 AM   #12
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I don't think the intent of the NEC was to allow a switch in the basement to be the means to turn a second floor lighting outlet on/off, but that is legal as well.

"The intent of the code" is a bogus argument IMO. The code is very specific and if the intent was to require a fixture or receptacle, it would state just that.
WADR, I wasn't arguing intent. The code is specific that an outlet is a point that current IS taken for utilization. "Is" is present tense and therefore the JB with cover IS NOT a point at which current is taken.

Just my opinion.

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Old 02-05-2014, 11:11 AM   #13
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


It appears that the least expensive solution would be to put an single or duplex plug outlet in the ceiling.
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:19 PM   #14
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It appears that the least expensive solution would be to put an single or duplex plug outlet in the ceiling.
I would just put a keyless porcelain fixture and call it done.

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Old 02-05-2014, 12:40 PM   #15
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Removing a Chandelier and leaving wires


Quote:
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WADR, I wasn't arguing intent. The code is specific that an outlet is a point that current IS taken for utilization. "Is" is present tense and therefore the JB with cover IS NOT a point at which current is taken. Just my opinion. Mark
If what you say is true, then by that definition, an unused duplex receptacle is not an outlet either.

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