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-   -   Relocating Service Drop/Weatherhead (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/relocating-service-drop-weatherhead-114112/)

Pittsville 08-15-2011 12:45 PM

Relocating Service Drop/Weatherhead
 
1 Attachment(s)
This is one part of our remodeling project that I thought I had pretty much figured out. Now I'm not so sure...

We're remodeling a 1880 Victorian home. We're going to be removing the existing wood siding and installing plywood sheathing, wrap and new siding. The tallest gable of the house reaches 32 feet, so we'll be using aluminum pump jacks to accomplish the work. In our way... the electrical service drop/weatherhead. We need to find a way to temporarily relocate the drop off of the house until we're finished re-siding.

The complicating factors:

1. We've moved into the house during remodeling, so we need to maintain electrical service during the re-siding project.

2. As stated above, we're using aluminum pump jacks, so the service drop needs to be at a safe distance from the house.

3. The room that houses the breaker box needs to be re-framed and re-sided. The room is currently too "short"... We need to make the ceiling higher. (The breaker box is behind the yellow "X" in the photo)

Our current thought process is as follows:

- Have power company disconnect service
- Bury 20 foot tall 4x4 post about 4 feet in ground
- Move drop to the 4x4 post
- Bury service entry wire and run underground from post to breaker box
- Have power company re-connect service

When it comes to re-framing the room that contains the breaker box, we were considering leaving the box in it's present position and framing around it. (ie: Leave the bottom plate and two wall studs that the box is hung between in place and remove the rest of the wall around them) When framing the new wall, we would sister new king studs up against the studs holding the breaker box. That way we wouldn't have to move the box or go without power for any length of time.

So how flawed is our thinking on this? We're open to all suggestions and criticisms. If you were contracted to move this service, what would you charge? We've got an electrician in mind, but want to have a better understanding of things before we get started. Thanks a million and sorry for the long windedness!

gregzoll 08-15-2011 12:59 PM

I would try to do a bury on the service, vs. overhead if you can. Can you post a shot showing between the pole & the house how the drop runs. Keep in mind, that you may be required with the new drop to do a whole lot of other stuff. Now is the time to get your ducks in the row and find out what your local will require and allow for this change of service.

Pittsville 08-15-2011 07:31 PM

Was raining cats and dogs today... Will take a photo and post tomorrow.

electures 08-15-2011 11:35 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pittsville
This is one part of our remodeling project that I thought I had pretty much figured out. Now I'm not so sure...

We're remodeling a 1880 Victorian home. We're going to be removing the existing wood siding and installing plywood sheathing, wrap and new siding. The tallest gable of the house reaches 32 feet, so we'll be using aluminum pump jacks to accomplish the work. In our way... the electrical service drop/weatherhead. We need to find a way to temporarily relocate the drop off of the house until we're finished re-siding.

The complicating factors:

1. We've moved into the house during remodeling, so we need to maintain electrical service during the re-siding project.

2. As stated above, we're using aluminum pump jacks, so the service drop needs to be at a safe distance from the house.

3. The room that houses the breaker box needs to be re-framed and re-sided. The room is currently too "short"... We need to make the ceiling higher. (The breaker box is behind the yellow "X" in the photo)

Our current thought process is as follows:

- Have power company disconnect service
- Bury 20 foot tall 4x4 post about 4 feet in ground
- Move drop to the 4x4 post
- Bury service entry wire and run underground from post to breaker box
- Have power company re-connect service

When it comes to re-framing the room that contains the breaker box, we were considering leaving the box in it's present position and framing around it. (ie: Leave the bottom plate and two wall studs that the box is hung between in place and remove the rest of the wall around them) When framing the new wall, we would sister new king studs up against the studs holding the breaker box. That way we wouldn't have to move the box or go without power for any length of time.

So how flawed is our thinking on this? We're open to all suggestions and criticisms. If you were contracted to move this service, what would you charge? We've got an electrician in mind, but want to have a better understanding of things before we get started. Thanks a million and sorry for the long windedness!

Just move the drop off the dwelling onto a temporary pole. Asking as it is not subject to vehicle traffic or damage it should be fine until your ready to permanently re attach it to the dwelling. The attached picture shows how I do it.

Pittsville 08-16-2011 04:42 PM

Is that a pump jack pole I see to the right of the temporary service?

gregzoll 08-16-2011 04:46 PM

It looks like it.

electures 08-16-2011 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pittsville (Post 708730)
Is that a pump jack pole I see to the right of the temporary service?

Yes and it's aluminum.

Pittsville 08-19-2011 05:53 PM

Just out of curiosity, has anyone put any thought to the subject of aluminum pump jacks and lightning. Anyone ever take measures to make the 24+ foot aluminum poles less attractive during lightning storms? Obviously wouldnt be out working on them during the storm, but discouraging lightning strikes that close to the house would be nice.

gregzoll 08-19-2011 06:52 PM

Yeah, you stay off of them. That is one reason at airports, when lightening strikes are within one mile, they suspend all ramp ops. Aircraft love to attract lightening. As for near the house, it is the same if lightening was to strike the utility poles. The only other concern I would have, is that some people tend to place wood blocking under the pump jacks to give them more of a foot print, so then the metal becomes no longer in contact with the ground.


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