Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-16-2011, 07:14 AM   #1
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Share |
Default

Red Tag


Four years ago I wired my new garage and passed the inspection without any problem, in fact the inspector wrote Nice Work on the sheet. This past winter we built a new house that had two load centers, one is for off peak heat. I even built up a relay box for the heat so I could have zones. I had only one boo boo. The when I wired the furnace, I used a switch receptacle combination so I could plug the condensate pump into the furnace circuit. Perfectly OK except the receptacle had to be GFCI because it is a crawl space. My other circuit in the crawl space was GFCI but I just didn't give it a thought when I picked up the switch. He said to get it changed and then gave me an OK on my wiring.
I see the term Red Tag frequently in this forum. What happens if the inspector Red Tags an installation?

a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 07:20 AM   #2
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,784
Default

Red Tag


Quote:
Originally Posted by a7ecorsair View Post
What happens if the inspector Red Tags an installation?
Then you correct the mistakes he found.
The ones he didn't find, you're on your own.

Speedy Petey is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Speedy Petey For This Useful Post:
frenchelectrican (10-16-2011)
Old 10-16-2011, 07:28 AM   #3
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,410
Default

Red Tag


Sometimes they need to re-inspect to ensure the changes are made, other times they leave it up to you on your honor.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jim Port For This Useful Post:
frenchelectrican (10-16-2011)
Old 10-16-2011, 07:57 AM   #4
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Default

Red Tag


I guess it just sounds worse than it really is. I suppose the extreme for residential would be to restrict any electrical power usage.
a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 10:02 AM   #5
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,410
Default

Red Tag


I would think that would only be done for serious safety hazards.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 10:22 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Default

Red Tag


Recently I had my whole panel replaced to get rid of the old Federal Pacific. The electrical company came out and pulled the meter. They put a lock on it, and wouldn't replace the meter till an inspector signed off on the work. So if the electrician had really botched the work, I'd have no electricity. I doubt that ever happens though.
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 11:12 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,503
Default

Red Tag


Quote:
Originally Posted by matt151617 View Post
Recently I had my whole panel replaced to get rid of the old Federal Pacific. The electrical company came out and pulled the meter. They put a lock on it, and wouldn't replace the meter till an inspector signed off on the work. So if the electrician had really botched the work, I'd have no electricity. I doubt that ever happens though.
I try my best to build the new service and install the new panel Before they pull the meter. In most instances, they just move the meter from one meter can to the other.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 10:15 PM   #8
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Default

Red Tag


Quote:
Originally Posted by a7ecorsair View Post
I see the term Red Tag frequently in this forum. What happens if the inspector Red Tags an installation?
Typically it mean it have to correct the code voliations as written however there are few case I get red tags that not related to the electrique parts more like safety issue that will useally take care of it.

However some Inspectors will have to come back and reinspect it and some do leave it to you in honour fashon.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 11:59 PM   #9
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 6,839
Default

Red Tag


Well.....my inspector tells me what is wrong and hands me a yellow tag......sometimes....and sometimes he tells me what is wrong and says to fix it and he will see me on the next inspection step. And I know to make sure it's corrected....because he will look at it on his next trip.

I like my inspector....the guy takes the time to explain things. In fact, the whole county office is good....If I have a question...I call....they do their best to answer.

__________________
"The dream is free but the hustle is sold separately."

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.