Recessed Lights In The Bathroom - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-17-2013, 11:45 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 859
Rewards Points: 694
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


I am going to install some recessed lights in the bathroom. Ceiling is down so I have full access.

After some searches I have decided to get three 4" lights.

Normally I prefer HALO products such as the H99, but I don't like their "damp location" trims. I looked around and this one by Lithonia caught my eye.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia-...5#.UZZNgUpXqMs



The trim is very clean and nice, and the cost is attractive too.

So I went to Home Depot and looked at it up close and I have a few concerns.

(1) Since my sheet rock is down I want to put these in with new construction housing. The Lithonia housing do not come in new construction housing, they come in remodel housing as the standard package, then you buy an additional new construction "kit", which include the pan and the two sliding metal bars. Anyone used those? Any concerns with using a remodel housing with these kits?

(2) My framing is a bit different. Old house. The trusses are south yellow pine. Then they nailed in 1x3 wood furring across all the trusses and attached sheet rock to those furring strips. This means if I attach these metal bars for the housing to the bottom of the joists, the housing has to be lowered by an additional 3/4" to be flushed with the finished ceiling. I don't think it's a good idea to attach the metal bar ends to the skinny end of these 1x3s. I know the Halo cans you can slide the can up and down to account for different ceiling thicknesses. These cans seem not to support those. Any ideas?

(3) Anyone know of other 4" products that has a similar look at comparable prices? I saw one by Juno but the trim itself is $100+ not what I can afford.

Thanks.

Advertisement

miamicuse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 12:05 PM   #2
JW
 
mm11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 214
Rewards Points: 194
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Why not use the cans as old work?

Rough-in romex with whips as necessary where the lights will sit.

Before hanging ceiling, cut holes in rock where the lights go, put it up, and pull the whips through the pre-cut holes.

Wire cans, and seat them into the ceiling.

No new work retro-fit kits needed, and save yourself the time, hassle, and money of using the kits.

Advertisement

mm11 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to mm11 For This Useful Post:
MTN REMODEL LLC (05-20-2013)
Old 05-17-2013, 04:26 PM   #3
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,904
Rewards Points: 2,162
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by mm11 View Post
Why not use the cans as old work?

Rough-in romex with whips as necessary where the lights will sit.

Before hanging ceiling, cut holes in rock where the lights go, put it up, and pull the whips through the pre-cut holes.

Wire cans, and seat them into the ceiling.

No new work retro-fit kits needed, and save yourself the time, hassle, and money of using the kits.
Are you kidding???? You honestly think that is less work than new-work cans??
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
Speedy Petey is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Speedy Petey For This Useful Post:
brric (05-17-2013), gregzoll (05-17-2013), Philly Master (05-17-2013)
Old 05-17-2013, 04:27 PM   #4
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,904
Rewards Points: 2,162
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicuse View Post

Normally I prefer HALO products such as the H99, but I don't like their "damp location" trims.
Almost all trims are damp location. Do you mean wet location?
Where are you putting these cans that need a glass trim? Inside the shower/tub?
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
Speedy Petey is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 04:45 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Eighty Four, Pa.15330
Posts: 1,412
Rewards Points: 822
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Scab 2x3's on side of ceiling joists. Support recessed lights from them.
bobelectric is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 04:50 PM   #6
Electrical Contractor
 
Philly Master's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: SE PA
Posts: 1,138
Rewards Points: 502
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicuse View Post
I am going to install some recessed lights in the bathroom. Ceiling is down so I have full access.

After some searches I have decided to get three 4" lights.

Normally I prefer HALO products such as the H99, but I don't like their "damp location" trims. I looked around and this one by Lithonia caught my eye.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia-...5#.UZZNgUpXqMs



The trim is very clean and nice, and the cost is attractive too.

So I went to Home Depot and looked at it up close and I have a few concerns.

(1) Since my sheet rock is down I want to put these in with new construction housing. The Lithonia housing do not come in new construction housing, they come in remodel housing as the standard package, then you buy an additional new construction "kit", which include the pan and the two sliding metal bars. Anyone used those? Any concerns with using a remodel housing with these kits?

(2) My framing is a bit different. Old house. The trusses are south yellow pine. Then they nailed in 1x3 wood furring across all the trusses and attached sheet rock to those furring strips. This means if I attach these metal bars for the housing to the bottom of the joists, the housing has to be lowered by an additional 3/4" to be flushed with the finished ceiling. I don't think it's a good idea to attach the metal bar ends to the skinny end of these 1x3s. I know the Halo cans you can slide the can up and down to account for different ceiling thicknesses. These cans seem not to support those. Any ideas?

(3) Anyone know of other 4" products that has a similar look at comparable prices? I saw one by Juno but the trim itself is $100+ not what I can afford.

Thanks.
6" is your best buy .....

2 over the vanity one in the shower ..

you only need "shower" trim over the shower not the rest of the bath ...


shower trims are funny "most" only a 40 watt bulb ....


new construction can is the way to go for this job ...IMHO ....
__________________
Philadelphia Master Electrician-Generac Dealer
Philly Master is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 08:40 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 859
Rewards Points: 694
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by mm11 View Post
Why not use the cans as old work?

Rough-in romex with whips as necessary where the lights will sit.

Before hanging ceiling, cut holes in rock where the lights go, put it up, and pull the whips through the pre-cut holes.

Wire cans, and seat them into the ceiling.

No new work retro-fit kits needed, and save yourself the time, hassle, and money of using the kits.
I see what you mean. The problem is staging.

For this remodel I have over 60 ceiling fixtures (some recessed, some 6", some 4", some regular boxes for non-recessed fixtures. On top of that boxes on walls. I am doing the electrical part myself and getting everything installed, then I will hire out the sheetrock work.

If I do it as old work, then I need to be present and mindful when the rockers are here and do their thing. My preference would be to get all that out of the way, test stuff out then let the rockers do their job.
miamicuse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 08:43 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 859
Rewards Points: 694
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Almost all trims are damp location. Do you mean wet location?
Where are you putting these cans that need a glass trim? Inside the shower/tub?
Not inside the shower, but the ceiling will get wet from the moisture.

I forgot to mention I am in South Florida, where it gets to 120% humidity in the summer, and after I take a shower, even with a high power exhaust fan, the ceiling is moist. I have flush mount light fixtures way outside the shower area that the metal start rusting like 1 month after installation.
miamicuse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 08:47 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 859
Rewards Points: 694
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by Philly Master View Post
6" is your best buy .....

2 over the vanity one in the shower ..

you only need "shower" trim over the shower not the rest of the bath ...


shower trims are funny "most" only a 40 watt bulb ....


new construction can is the way to go for this job ...IMHO ....
I am using HALO 6" trims everywhere EXCEPT hallways and bathrooms.

In hallways the 6" trims look too big, so I used H99T and the 993W trim.

Obviously in the bathroom I can't use the open trim. It's more a look preference than a functional preference.
miamicuse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 09:14 PM   #10
Master Electrician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 2,977
Rewards Points: 2,210
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Are any of these installations going to be in contact with insulation?
brric is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 09:26 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 859
Rewards Points: 694
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
Are any of these installations going to be in contact with insulation?
No...or should I say, I will trim back the insulation 3" from the fixtures all around.
miamicuse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 09:46 PM   #12
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 8,034
Rewards Points: 2,866
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Recessed lights over a vanity create very hard shadow lines on the face and under the chin. It is not the most flattering.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jim Port For This Useful Post:
Speedy Petey (05-18-2013)
Old 05-17-2013, 09:54 PM   #13
Master Electrician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 2,977
Rewards Points: 2,210
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicuse View Post
No...or should I say, I will trim back the insulation 3" from the fixtures all around.
Personally, I would never install non-IC rated cans in an insulated location.
brric is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to brric For This Useful Post:
Jim Port (05-17-2013)
Old 05-17-2013, 10:05 PM   #14
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 8,034
Rewards Points: 2,866
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


You are right bricc, all that does is create a hole that the heated or cooled air will pass thru and run up the energy bill year round.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2013, 08:02 AM   #15
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,904
Rewards Points: 2,162
Default

Recessed lights in the bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicuse View Post
Not inside the shower, but the ceiling will get wet from the moisture.

I forgot to mention I am in South Florida, where it gets to 120% humidity in the summer, and after I take a shower, even with a high power exhaust fan, the ceiling is moist. I have flush mount light fixtures way outside the shower area that the metal start rusting like 1 month after installation.
NONE of these areas is a wet location.
A bathroom ceiling is a damp location. You can use pretty much any standard recessed/trim combo.

Even inside a shower is only considered a damp location unless the light is subject to shower spray.

Advertisement

__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
Speedy Petey is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bathroom lights not fully powered tcfls2 Electrical 21 03-12-2013 11:46 PM
Adding Additional Recessed lights to existing jay235 Electrical 5 11-08-2012 06:43 PM
Wiring in New Addition? sandyman720 Electrical 6 11-27-2011 04:34 PM
IC recessed lights getting hot? shockingsi Electrical 4 08-04-2011 01:56 AM
Bedroom Recessed Lights gregt848 Electrical 11 03-08-2010 05:07 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts