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-   -   Receptacle type for 220v in workshop? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/receptacle-type-220v-workshop-52717/)

Roy Rowlett 09-10-2009 08:46 AM

Receptacle type for 220v in workshop?
 
I am wiring a new workshop for 220v and I am not sure what type of outlet/receptacle I should put in the wall. Would a NEMA 6-20R be OK, or is there another type that would be better, or more common for woodworking tools? I don't have the tools yet, so I am trying to anticipate what I will need. Would you expect that I will be attaching the 220v plugs to my 220v tools, and will therefore have control over which receptacle type I use? My 220v circuit is 20amp.

junkcollector 09-10-2009 10:56 AM

The 6-20 is pretty common for woodworking machines in home workshops. The other type you could use is a L6-20 twistlock, but thats gonna cost a lot more money.

J. V. 09-10-2009 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roy Rowlett (Post 326038)
I am wiring a new workshop for 220v and I am not sure what type of outlet/receptacle I should put in the wall. Would a NEMA 6-20R be OK, or is there another type that would be better, or more common for woodworking tools? I don't have the tools yet, so I am trying to anticipate what I will need. Would you expect that I will be attaching the 220v plugs to my 220v tools, and will therefore have control over which receptacle type I use? My 220v circuit is 20amp.

It is highly unlikely all your tools will use the same plug, current or voltage. One receptacle would not be a good idea for several tools.

A small sub panel makes more sense. This way you can provide the correct receptacles for each tool.
Look at the top of the page and see sticky "Stubbies Diagrams". There you will find a wiring diagram for the sub panel that I recommend.

Roy Rowlett 09-11-2009 11:02 AM

Why locking plug?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by junkcollector (Post 326085)
The 6-20 is pretty common for woodworking machines in home workshops. The other type you could use is a L6-20 twistlock, but thats gonna cost a lot more money.

I know I have the option of using a locking plug. Why would I choose this option? Since it costs a lot more, I don't know if why I might need it. I will be using these outlets for cabinet tools, i.e. bandsaw, etc.

J. V. 09-11-2009 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roy Rowlett (Post 326478)
I know I have the option of using a locking plug. Why would I choose this option? Since it costs a lot more, I don't know if why I might need it. I will be using these outlets for cabinet tools, i.e. bandsaw, etc.

Twist locks are used in industrial and commercial installations where the plug coming undone just cannot be tolerated. They work very well, but are not necessary as most of your tools will have their own plugs, right?

Does every tool you own have the same cord and plug? If they all do, then one receptacle would suffice, but not be a smart way to do this.
Does not sound like you are listening. One receptacle in a shop is stupid. :whistling2:

Roy Rowlett 09-11-2009 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J. V. (Post 326486)
Twist locks are used in industrial and commercial installations where the plug coming undone just cannot be tolerated. They work very well, but are not necessary as most of your tools will have their own plugs, right?

Does every tool you own have the same cord and plug? If they all do, then one receptacle would suffice, but not be a smart way to do this.
Does not sound like you are listening. One receptacle in a shop is stupid. :whistling2:

I am listening. You assumed that I have only one outlet in my shop. I don't know why you would think that. I have 23 20amp 110v outlets, and 3 20amp 220v outlets. I have spaced the 220v outlets around the wall for ease of use. I have a sub-panel at 60 amps in my shop running from my main service panel which is 200 amps. Right now I have only one tool that uses 220v, a bandsaw, that is rated at 15 amps. My original question was about selecting the 220v outlet type, not how to install multiple outlets or subpanels.

junkcollector 09-11-2009 03:49 PM

Roy,


I think that the 6-20R is the way to go. I use them in my shop, and have set up other shops using the same config. In my orginal reply, I assumed that you would have multiple receptacles. :thumbsup:


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