Radiant Floor Heating Circuit - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-03-2014, 04:43 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Hello,
I am going to install SunTouch radiant floor heating in my 2nd floor bathroom. There currently is a Jacuzzi in the bathroom and it is on a 20 amp GFCI circuit. Nothing else is connected to that circuit. The motor in the Jacuzzi is hp and the name plate says 10a on it. The Jacuzzi motor has a plug in cord that is plugged into a standard 3 prong receptacle (1 gang box). I was going to power the floors off this circuit. The floor will draw 2.5 amps. To wire the radiant heat into the circuit I was going to pig tail (short wire and splice wires) the black, white and ground inside the existing 1 gang box with #12 AWG (hooking the outlet back up with the short side of the pig tail of course). To get from the outlet to the floor heat controller I am going to drill a hole in the floor, run the wire down the hole to get between the floors and then along the Ibeam to the wall (about 8 feet away) the controller is on. I will again drill a hole in the floor inside the wall the controller is on and pull the wire up to the 1 gang box the controller will be attached to. I will then wire the floor heat in according to the manufactures instructions to the controller. The floor heat controller has a GFCI in it. The holes with wire going in and coming out will not be seen because one is inside the wall and the other is covered by the box surrounding the Jacuzzi. Does this sound correct? Do I need to use wire rated for a damp location? The circuit is on a GFCI CB, will adding a floor heat controller that has a GFCI in it affect the circuit adversely? I want this to be NEC compliant is there anything else I need to do?
Thanks,
Jon

Advertisement

goodview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2014, 08:20 PM   #2
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,368
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Sounds good to me. Unless the wiring itself is subject to wet conditions, there is no need to use any special wiring methods.

Advertisement

__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2014, 08:29 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 330
Rewards Points: 296
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by goodview View Post
The floor heat controller has a GFCI in it. The holes with wire going in and coming out will not be seen because one is inside the wall and the other is covered by the box surrounding the Jacuzzi. Does this sound correct? Do I need to use wire rated for a damp location? The circuit is on a GFCI CB, will adding a floor heat controller that has a GFCI in it affect the circuit adversely?
Nope. In this scenario the cicuit breaker's GFCI could trip (indicating a fault in either your jacuzzi motor or the floor heating) or the floor heater's own GFCI could trip (indicating a fault in the floor heating only). The only concern of daisy chaining GFCIs like this, which in your case is a minor concern, is that you might have to do some wandering around to test things and figure out what's wrong, since you'll have GFCIs in multiple locations
JKeefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 11:05 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Thanks for taking the time to reply and confirming my plan! Now the work begins.
goodview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2014, 11:46 AM   #5
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,572
Rewards Points: 2,040
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by goodview View Post
Hello,
The circuit is on a GFCI CB, will adding a floor heat controller that has a GFCI in it affect the circuit adversely? I want this to be NEC compliant is there anything else I need to do?
Thanks,
Jon
Not a problem. It's worth noting that the floor heat thermostat probably has GPF(E) rather than GFCI protection. That's a 30mA trip point instead of 5mA. So the GFCi CB will likely trip first, and will trip on a smaller fault than the thermostat's protection.
__________________
I am a lawyer, but not your lawyer. And who cares anyways? We're here to talk construction. This is DIY advice, not legal advice.
mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2014, 12:25 PM   #6
JW
 
mm11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 214
Rewards Points: 194
Default

radiant floor heating circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Not a problem. It's worth noting that the floor heat thermostat probably has GPF(E) rather than GFCI protection. That's a 30mA trip point instead of 5mA. So the GFCi CB will likely trip first, and will trip on a smaller fault than the thermostat's protection.
I've installed these before- they are GFCI protected. I can't think of anything off the top of my head that would have GFPE in a residential application.

Advertisement

mm11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
electrical


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water Dripping From Circuit Breaker Box/Frayed Service Line Magnetic Electrical 6 02-03-2014 04:50 PM
NEC - what is the purpose of some of these codes ? chez bouton Electrical 32 12-17-2013 03:04 PM
Dispute: Oven malfunction after h/w guys used the circuit rational Appliances 18 05-17-2011 11:37 PM
Changing a 3 way circuit...using recessed lighting box as a junction box? Oxymoron Electrical 1 12-07-2009 07:46 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts