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-   -   Quick Question about Ceiling Fan LIGHT KITS (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/quick-question-about-ceiling-fan-light-kits-119123/)

watts up? 10-03-2011 02:10 PM

Quick Question about Ceiling Fan LIGHT KITS
 
We're buying ceiling fans that are light-kit adaptable but we want to understand our limitations on how high the wattage is that we can safely go to. In a nutshell, what is driving the wattage capacity -->> the electrical in the fan, or the electrical in the light kit? Does the one have anything to do with limiting the other?

We have a fan with a pathetic 40W Christmas Tree-type bulb that came bundled with its (equally puny) light kit and we want to put a new light kit on it. Matching the glass dimensions isn't a problem (there are dozens of globes we can choose from) but we're unclear about whether it's safe to ramp this little ceiling fan up with the 100W-incandescent-bulb-kit we want to attach to it. I don't want the thing to start smokin' and burn the house down tsk. :laughing:

And folks, if you were on the fence about a ceiling fan -- and you like the traditional incandescent bulbs you've grown up with -- you'd better get your fan now because they're all migrating to these dinky little bulbs!! Man it just fries me (no pun intended).

Anyway, thanks for any help.

wu

DangerMouse 10-03-2011 02:28 PM

100W-incandescent-bulbs will get too hot to use in an upside-down fan light.
60 watts is max for most of those, I believe. Multiple curly cfls will work just fine.
Also, if you change it out and it catches fire, your insurance will not pay.

DM

rjniles 10-03-2011 04:09 PM

[quote=DangerMouse;741293
Also, if you change it out and it catches fire, your insurance will not pay.

DM[/quote]

I really doubt that.

DangerMouse 10-03-2011 04:44 PM

Unless it's a UL approved unit and the correct wattage bulbs are used, no insurance would cover it that I know of. You really don't think they'd use that as an excuse not to pay? I've never seen home ceiling fan light kits rated for 100w bulbs, have you?

DM

rjniles 10-03-2011 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DangerMouse (Post 741397)
Unless it's a UL approved unit and the correct wattage bulbs are used, no insurance would cover it that I know of. You really don't think they'd use that as an excuse not to pay? I've never seen home ceiling fan light kits rated for 100w bulbs, have you?

DM

No but I do not believe a insurance company could deny a claim for using a 100 watt bulb in a 60 watt fixture.

DangerMouse 10-03-2011 05:52 PM

I saw a claim denied because the guy had wired his own shed..... and it had nothing to do with the grease fire that started in his kitchen!

DM

watts up? 10-05-2011 09:27 PM

I've narrowed it down to a few different 100/120W incandescent light kits but I just really don't want to be limited to the fans they originally were designed for. I don't mind staying with the same manufacturer (eg. a LIGHT KIT A with FAN G, both from the same mfg.) but beyond that I start to feel hamstrung.

I just really would like to understand how the two interact. Thanks.

wu

jbfan 10-05-2011 09:32 PM

The light kit is rated independent of the fan.
If you have found a 100 watt light kit, go for it.

I don't think you found a 120 watt light kit.

Jim Port 10-06-2011 12:04 AM

If I understand your question correctly, the ability to add the light kit or not depends on the circuit ampacity and how much reserve capacity there is left before the light kit is added.

The light kit sockets will have a maximum bulb size on them.


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