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Old 01-03-2011, 03:11 PM   #1
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questions Nichrome wire


First let me say I know just enough to get me in trouble (an that isn't much) Please try to educate me with hurting your self laughing to hard

I have a couple questions related to Nichorme wire used to make heating elements . I will be using this for a home made foundry furnace and basic can see there are two types one is water cooled induction coils which I would not be sure how to regulate and the other is coiled nichorme wire (most say use 18 ga)

correct me if I am wrong on any part of this so far by acutal coiling the wire instead of just a straight wire it can produce say 2000 degrees at half the power as the straight wire could. Also the shorter the over all coil is it will have more resistances thus more heat is that correct so far?

Is it possible to get nichorme coiled wire up to 3000 degree temps without melting ? (highest I saw was 2000 degrees) and what gauge would be recommended ?

would a heavier gauge of nichorme wire produce more or less heat for example a 8 ga compared to a 18 ga coiled heat element wire ?

I guess this part is a closely guarded secret or something as I have not gotten a answer form the furnace builders but I am assuming (yes I know that will get me in trouble) this: 110v house hold power you have three wires white positive, black neutral and green ground I assume if you have a coiled nichorme heat element one end connects to the white and one to the black .......maybe.......

any help would be greatly appreciated

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Old 01-03-2011, 03:25 PM   #2
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questions Nichrome wire


I can't give you a lot of direction but I can give some insight into a few points:

Quote:
correct me if I am wrong on any part of this so far by acutal coiling the wire instead of just a straight wire it can produce say 2000 degrees at half the power as the straight wire could.
the ultimate temp produced would be the same but a straight wire will not concentrate the heat in any given area.

Quote:
Also the shorter the over all coil is it will have more resistances thus more heat is that correct so far?
resistance will be greater the longer a piece of wire. The less the resistance, the more current will flow and the more heat produced.

the melting point of nichrome (an alloy of nickel (80%) and chromium (20%) is 2552F so no, you cannot produce 3000F heat with nichrome wire. It will simply melt.

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Old 01-03-2011, 03:33 PM   #3
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questions Nichrome wire


The resistance of the wire increases as its temperature increases.

The number of amperes drawn equals the voltage (110) divided by the resistance of the wire. The number of watts of heat theoretically equals the number of volts times the number of amps.

A fatter wire would have less resistance. Depending on your project you might use two thinner wires (in parallel) instead of one fatter wire.

You would need expertise to figure out how long a piece of Nichrome wire you would need to build your project with.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:44 PM   #4
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questions Nichrome wire


form what I have found there using a 15' piece of 18 ga then wrapping of coiling it which reduces the length to about 6' and you have to stretch it back out a bit


ok so I want a short element for less resistance to flow more power and produce more heat , thanks I may be better off with four or five short elements instead of one long one like I have been seeing

Thanks for the help
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:01 PM   #5
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questions Nichrome wire


you have to design an element to have enough resistance so this is not a short and allows too much current to flow. That would result in a tripping breaker or a melted element.
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