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Old 11-05-2007, 10:16 AM   #16
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Question on generator wiring


On the money Stubb,
I only have a 8kw unit. It will run the clothes dryer, but not the dryer and the washing machine at the same time. No issue. But the point is made about what can be operated and what cannot.

My advise to the poster is to open the door of his panel board and mark every breaker (the legend on the door) correctly.
Then see what the generator will run and what it won't. It's much easier to do this now instead of when the power goes off.
If he can get a hold of an amp clamp he would be able to get a good idea of what things can be operated at the same time.
A little time spent now will pay big dividend's when the power goes off at night.

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Old 11-05-2007, 10:24 AM   #17
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Question on generator wiring


I was leaning toward the interlock kit, but there's no way I'm paying $150 + shipping for this:

http://www.interlockkit.com/Merchant...tegory_Code=CH

What is that, some kind of joke? I could do that with a sheet of mild steel, my drill press and a Dremel tool in a couple of hours (which is what I'm going to do).

Plus, they sell the outdoor generator convenience outlet for $300 (!!) and the backfeed breaker for $23. Now, if all that came in a kit for $150, I'd buy it.

Are there any code requirements as to where the outdoor generator outlet must be? Like 3 feet off the ground or anything like that? And do you hard-wire the neutral from the generator line directly to the neutral bar inside the breaker box?
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Old 11-05-2007, 12:14 PM   #18
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Question on generator wiring


Yep a little pricey for what you get. You seem to be the resourceful type so you might want to check Ebay out they just might have what you want for a song and a dance.
Some load center manufacturers are now making interlock kits for about 50 bucks so you might check cutler hammer and see if they make one. I know Square d makes them.

As far as the inlet is concerned just locate it above the snow line if you have one...hopefully it isn't six feet....and make sure it is a weather proof one.

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Old 11-05-2007, 12:43 PM   #19
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Question on generator wiring


theoreticly you would be right, however there is no way to disconnect the HOT [line-in] side of the home circuit breakers, you have to tap into the system after the home circuit breakers.
pk
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Old 11-05-2007, 01:04 PM   #20
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I'm sorry i don't understand what your saying...tap in after the circuit breakers...what are you refering to??? and to what were you replying to?
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Old 11-05-2007, 03:06 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdalli View Post
I was leaning toward the interlock kit, but there's no way I'm paying $150 + shipping for this:

http://www.interlockkit.com/Merchant...tegory_Code=CH
Yeah, that site is out of line. You can get kits MUCH cheaper.
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Old 11-05-2007, 09:00 PM   #22
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Question on generator wiring


Ok, I'm going to make my own interlock plate out of thin steel plate, use a standard exterior-rated connection to connect the generator outside and run probably 8 AWG copper for the very short length in between the connector and the breaker box.

2 last questions:
- Hard-wire the neutral and the ground from the generator line directly to the neutral bar and ground bar inside the breaker box, correct?
- Ok to use a standard 2 leg 40 amp breaker? I'm not aware of what my alternative would be.
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Old 11-05-2007, 09:09 PM   #23
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Please understand that what your doing is not going to be accepted nor approved by any electrical authority. You are free of course to do what you wish. I know this is a DIY site but we still have to give advice that is code compliant.

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Old 11-06-2007, 09:24 AM   #24
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Why is it unacceptable to fabricate an interlock plate identical to what that interlockkit site charges $150 for?

My finished setup will be absolutely identical to their interlock setup, including all applicable stickers, it just won't cost me $450.
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Old 11-06-2007, 01:35 PM   #25
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I strongly agree with Stubbie.
You can obviously do what you want, but I would NOT, NOT, do as you suggest.
What are you saving, really? EVEN if you get the $150 interlock, you might save $100 in the end. IMO it is NOT worth the risk.

Find a more reasonably priced interlock for your panel. They do NOT all cost $150.
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Old 11-06-2007, 04:46 PM   #26
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Here's the deal.... anything that is used on service equipment...any accessory... whatever.... must have a testing label like UL on it. The inspectors will not make exception for a home made interlock. The interlock kit was refused for some time by the testing labs due to being easily defeated. If you have that one in thousand or hundred thousand accident and the investigation shows you are at fault with a unlisted interlock and no inspection and no poco approval you will pay dearly for this attempt at saving a buck. Might seem an acceptable risk but it could come back to haunt you. If you decide to make this... make freakin sure that nothing... screws... bolts etc extend too far into the cabinet and contact the hot lugs or you will be the accident when you put the cover back on the load center. Hey I'm all for people working on their own stuff but you really should reconsider your plan.
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Old 11-06-2007, 05:03 PM   #27
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Stubbie :

yes that true i know there were about 3 or 4 interlock kits were not approved for while but not too long ago they finally approved it what details it was i was not sure but for myself i always get the UL approved items to work with the breakerbox.

that why i always becarefull with the homemade interlock i did see few very shroddy work as well too easy to defeat it etc etc ..

some were outright scarey i try to find one photo that show really shroddy work with sudice cord still alive on one end .

merci, Marc
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Old 11-09-2007, 09:36 PM   #28
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I have installed kits from www.interlockkits.com for a few customers, they basically convert your exiting panel into a manual transfer switch. One note, the kits do use the top three spaces on the right side of your panel, this may require relocating some breakers and possibly installng some split breakers to make room.
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Old 11-09-2007, 09:47 PM   #29
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Yep and so does the one that Mdali is going to copy at his home shop. I think the link you gave is the same one earlier in this thread.
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Old 11-10-2007, 11:49 AM   #30
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I agree the interlock kit that I posted is a bit pricey. But I just looked for interlock kits on a "Google" search.
The idea to fabricate this interlock while saving money is not the correct way to go. What if your house burned down for some other electrical reason and this homemade device was found in your panel. I bet your insurance company would be hard pressed to pay you.
Find a cheaper/less money interlock that is UL approved and go with that.
The main reason I posted was to inform that transfer switches in residential dwellings are not required. Unless you just want one.

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