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-   -   Question: 14 on 20 AMP with one foot run. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/question-14-20-amp-one-foot-run-107256/)

JonoPorter 06-10-2011 11:09 AM

Question: 14 on 20 AMP with one foot run.
 
Here is the Issue: I installed an outlet in a closet on the opposite side of the wall of an existing outlet. And wired it with 14. This run is around a foot. The outlet I ran it from has an 15 AMP outlet but the wire feeding it is 12 and is on a 20 AMP breaker. I didn't notice this until I was done wiring it. Is this unsafe should I bother rewiring it? Someone already told me that on this short of run it doesn't matter.

jbfan 06-10-2011 11:13 AM

Redo it with the correct wire.

vsheetz 06-10-2011 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 664662)
Redo it with the correct wire.

ditto

Jim Port 06-10-2011 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 664662)
Redo it with the correct wire.

Or change the breaker to a 15 amp and lose 25% of the circuit capacity.

Leah Frances 06-10-2011 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JonoPorter (Post 664659)
Here is the Issue: I installed an outlet in a closet on the opposite side of the wall of an existing outlet. And wired it with 14. This run is around a foot. The outlet I ran it from has an 15 AMP outlet but the wire feeding it is 12 and is on a 20 AMP breaker. I didn't notice this until I was done wiring it. Is this unsafe should I bother rewiring it? Someone already told me that on this short of run it doesn't matter.

Re-wire it or swap the breaker to 15amp.

And don't take electrical advice from 'someone'. He doesn't know what he's talking about or he's cavalier.

electures 06-10-2011 10:18 PM

Change the wire to 12 wire. The circuit may be a small appliance branch circuit which requires a 20A breaker.

WillK 06-10-2011 10:35 PM

Just to be clear about the part you asked about but which nobody else actually adressed directly... The 15 amp receptacle is allowable on a 20 amp circuit.

20 amp circuit can not have 14 ga. wire.

electures 06-10-2011 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WillK (Post 665074)
Just to be clear about the part you asked about but which nobody else actually adressed directly... The 15 amp receptacle is allowable on a 20 amp circuit.

20 amp circuit can not have 14 ga. wire.

Yes and yes.

gregzoll 06-10-2011 11:09 PM

There is that catch 22 about lighting, that the manufacturer uses smaller gauge wire on the fixture.

electures 06-10-2011 11:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 665101)
There is that catch 22 about lighting, that the manufacturer uses smaller gauge wire on the fixture.

Lighting does not belong on a small appliance circuit. Assuming it is in fact a small appliance circuit.

gregzoll 06-10-2011 11:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electures (Post 665117)
Lighting does not belong on a small appliance circuit. Assuming it is in fact a small appliance circuit.

Nothing was stated by the OP that this may be a Small Appliance Branch Circuit. I am assuming that it is not, because nothing was stated that this circuit is in the Kitchen or Dining areas. For all we know, it could be in the garage, basement, who knows where. Just to clue you in, it was stated that this circuit feeds a closet, which means that it is a lighting circuit, which can feed off of a receptacle circuit in the Living Room, Basement, bedrooms, Garage, who knows, only the person doing it knows what it feeds off of.

frenchelectrican 06-11-2011 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WillK (Post 665074)
Just to be clear about the part you asked about but which nobody else actually adressed directly... The 15 amp receptacle is allowable on a 20 amp circuit.

20 amp circuit can not have 14 ga. wire.

Quote:

Originally Posted by electures (Post 665075)
Yes and yes.

common 15 amp duplex receptales are allowed on 20 amp circuit {unless stated in your local code otherwise }

But Singleplex 15A receptale then no it is not legit on 20 amp circuit.

That part I just want to clear it up before someone jump on this one too quick.

Merci,
Marc

AllanJ 06-11-2011 06:16 AM

The tap rule (I forget chapter and verse in the NEC) allows the little (16-18 gauge) wires, called taps, in a light fixture to connect to a 15 or 20 amp circuit. This rule specifies the maximum length of such smaller wires, it is something like 14 inches, preventing 14 gauge wires from the wall switch all the way up to the ceilint light in a 20 amp circuit.

Now there are bathroom lights with a shaver receptacle (labeled max X watts) that have <14 gauge wires to connect to the power source. Perhaps something like this gave someone the idea that running a foot of 14 gauge on a 20 amp circuit was okay. Except that if run to a duplex receptacle, there could be two things plugged in drawing a total of more than 15 amps.

You can have single (non-duplex) 15 amp receptacles on a 20 amp circuit provided there are at least two receptacles altogether.

Heating of the wire due to larger current draw produces just as many BTU of heat at any spot in a 1 foot segment as in a 10 yard segment. It is the spot BTU, not the BTU over the leng6th of the entire wire, that presents a hazard.

OT: Meanwhile the voltage drop in each foot of a piece of wire, with a given load in amperes, is the same. It is the cumulative voltage drop over the entire length of the wire (round trip; hot and neutral for 120 volt circuits) that you are interested in.

SD515 06-11-2011 08:32 AM

When someone says “The outlet I ran it from has an 15 AMP outlet but the wire feeding it is 12 and is on a 20 AMP breaker” the first thing that comes to mind is kitchen SABC, laundry or bath receptacles, none of which are allowed to be ‘tapped’ to feed ‘an outlet in a closet’ (in general). Anyone else catch that?

Jim Port 06-11-2011 08:39 AM

I think everyone picked up on the incorrect mixing of the wire sizes and may not have thought about the source of the circuit or its possible restrictions.


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