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Old 03-17-2008, 10:53 PM   #31
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Well it's rather long answer, but applies to all trades equally IMO. First you need to know what the heck your doing and with electrical doubly so. Passing tests and getting licensed doesn't necessarily make you a good electrician. In generally the road to that licensing does mean you have had the necessary training and on job work to give you the knowledge to safely do work for hire on others property. I'm actually not aware of any place like Robert says that allows you to do electrical work for hire as your own contractor without licensing. Now notice I said as your own contractor. There are lots of states and localities that allow you to work for a licensed contractor without you yourself being licensed. Generally though if you are connecting wires to devices and equipment for hire you are required licensing and most contractors want you licensed for that capacity. Not always the case but preferred. When I say not always the case there are lots of self employed remodelers that do electrical work without permit or inspection. This includes handymen and drywallers and roughin workers, plumbers, one man HVAC techs, friends, neighbors etc... In residential this is very common. Not legal but common. It can be common in commercial as maintenace men are jacks of all trades but they are not doing hired work for someone else. So it isn't like it never happens. I'm not sure however how you can sign off on inspected work that you hired yourself out for as Robert said. Generally you must list your license # and expirations in my area when you get electrical permits. As for penalities yes if the local codes authority discovers one of your unpermitted jobs they can put a stop work notice on your job site. If they find your doing work that requires licensing and permits then your job can be shut down and you may face fines and prosecution.


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Old 03-18-2008, 05:31 AM   #32
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


The permit is in the window where it should be, I am in constant contact with the building inspector, and the electrical inspector, and I do a bunch of work for a lawyer. I also work for 3 electricians, and I have never had a problem. The only work I do is residential, and I HAVE NEVER FAILED AN INSPECTION. I just came here to get some better ideas, and get you guys going. I have been to school on residential electric. I think it would be a waste of time to learn a bunch of commercial electric, and code I will never use. I'm not going to go to school so I can regurgitate a bunch of knowledge I will never use. 99% of the work I do is for poorer people that can't afford your inflated ego prices. I am 100% legal all of the time, and insured. (I lied I have worked on some commercial electric in Tennessee as a EH.) Everything here falls on the inspection as it should be. Does this mean that all electricians helpers are illegal, I don't think so..

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Old 03-18-2008, 05:40 AM   #33
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbie View Post
Well it's rather long answer, but applies to all trades equally IMO. First you need to know what the heck your doing and with electrical doubly so. Passing tests and getting licensed doesn't necessarily make you a good electrician. In generally the road to that licensing does mean you have had the necessary training and on job work to give you the knowledge to safely do work for hire on others property. I'm actually not aware of any place like Robert says that allows you to do electrical work for hire as your own contractor without licensing. Now notice I said as your own contractor. There are lots of states and localities that allow you to work for a licensed contractor without you yourself being licensed. Generally though if you are connecting wires to devices and equipment for hire you are required licensing and most contractors want you licensed for that capacity. Not always the case but preferred. When I say not always the case there are lots of self employed remodelers that do electrical work without permit or inspection. This includes handymen and drywallers and roughin workers, plumbers, one man HVAC techs, friends, neighbors etc... In residential this is very common. Not legal but common. It can be common in commercial as maintenace men are jacks of all trades but they are not doing hired work for someone else. So it isn't like it never happens. I'm not sure however how you can sign off on inspected work that you hired yourself out for as Robert said. Generally you must list your license # and expirations in my area when you get electrical permits. As for penalities yes if the local codes authority discovers one of your unpermitted jobs they can put a stop work notice on your job site. If they find your doing work that requires licensing and permits then your job can be shut down and you may face fines and prosecution.
In *alot* of NY State, you do NOT need to be licensed to perform electrical work for hire.
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Old 03-18-2008, 08:48 AM   #34
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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In *alot* of NY State, you do NOT need to be licensed to perform electrical work for hire.
Ok, so doing this is legal in NY. I bet a person can still be sued for burning a house down. And for misrepresenting himself as a qualified person. My greater concern would be the latter. That is, being hired by a person who is not aware you are not a trained and qualified electrician. A families life could be at stake. Without them even being aware of the problem.

Electrical helpers work under the guidance and watchful eye of a qualified electrician. That is altogether different than being a contractor in my opinion.

Thanks for the information Andy. I will have no more to say on the subject.

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