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Old 03-15-2008, 02:45 PM   #16
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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No, All I was saying is that you need to have that 1 1/4", and if you have a 2" stud and drull a 3/8 hole through the center, you don't have 1 1/4" on both sides. Using a 1" furring strip gives you JUST ENOUGH space. Using another 2/x on top of the existing stud gives you even more clearence.
Andy, 300.4 says 1 1/4" OR use steel plates or bushings. So you don't HAVE to maintain the 1 1/4". In the hollow spaces you need to stay away from the framing members 1 1/4", not from the drywall. Look at the picture Chris posted.


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Old 03-15-2008, 04:12 PM   #17
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Maybe required to obtain the proper insulation value anyway.... just my 2 cents... I know I would fur it out for insulation alone...



Probably an interior wall.
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Old 03-15-2008, 05:31 PM   #18
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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Andy, 300.4 says 1 1/4" OR use steel plates or bushings. So you don't HAVE to maintain the 1 1/4". In the hollow spaces you need to stay away from the framing members 1 1/4", not from the drywall. Look at the picture Chris posted.

Yes, I understand this now. I went and read that section and get it. BUT, the OP stated that the other side of the wall was finished already, so would not be able to use plates to protect it from the other side. In essence, it could still be done this way, but the studs would not be able to be bored through in order to maintain clearence from the other side, so they would have to be notched at the face of the stud. Then, the wiring would be REALLY close to the back side of the drywall...


Not saying that this can't be done, but isn't the best idea. I personally wouldn't do it.
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Old 03-15-2008, 06:26 PM   #19
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Why are we in a conversation about boring and notching when the wall is being accessed from the attic? Just sleeve in 3/4 emt to a 4 by metal box as Chris mentioned.
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:02 PM   #20
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


This IS a boring conversation
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:38 PM   #21
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Now that was witty and for once I agree with you....
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Old 03-15-2008, 10:18 PM   #22
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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Is there a certain length that you can do it for?
I believe the Code doesn't mention a length limitation. It simply says it can be protected by EMT, IMC, rigid, or Sch. 80 PVC.

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Old 03-16-2008, 07:25 AM   #23
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


The way I have handled this in the past is to tear out the wall and frame it with 2x4's. The wall is junk, the plaster is cracked, and loose but the customer won't budge. It has hot water baseboards on both sides that I would have to move. The dam wall is only 11 ft long, and hanging buy a piece of one by. I wasn't sure I could run romex in EMT. I told the customer I was going to run some ideas by other electricians to find the safest/economical way to do this. I'm sorry I assumed this was a site to ask questions.
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Old 03-16-2008, 10:51 AM   #24
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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The way I have handled this in the past is to tear out the wall and frame it with 2x4's. The wall is junk, the plaster is cracked, and loose but the customer won't budge. It has hot water baseboards on both sides that I would have to move. The dam wall is only 11 ft long, and hanging buy a piece of one by. I wasn't sure I could run romex in EMT. I told the customer I was going to run some ideas by other electricians to find the safest/economical way to do this. I'm sorry I assumed this was a site to ask questions.
Yes, Robert, this site is to ask questions. It's just that some folks are a little uneasy with the fact that you are doing CONTRACTING work for money, when in fact you are not an electrician. It is one thing to be a DIYer on your own home. It is quite another thing to sell your work without the proper qualifications and licensing and insurance.

But, I want you to do it in the safest way possible for the unsuspecting homeowner. So, yes, you can sleeve your romex in EMT. Or IMC, or rigid, or sch. 80 PVC. Carlon also makes a plastic single gang box just for shallow walls that has the capacity for more than a single cable. You can find it at Home Ripoff or Blowes. It is shallow with a side jut that makes up the volume.

Be Safe.

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Old 03-16-2008, 11:41 AM   #25
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


I have blanket liability insurance for $1,000,000. As long as the inspector passes my work, and buy the way I have never failed an inspection. I don't really care what anyone thinks. ALL OF MY WORK IS INSPECTED. Why do you guys always assume the worst. Do you have personal insurance. A Judge, and Jury could come after you if you did something stupid. Even if the company you work for has insurance..... There is more than one way to skin a cat.

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Old 03-16-2008, 04:30 PM   #26
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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I have blanket liability insurance for $1,000,000. As long as the inspector passes my work, and buy the way I have never failed an inspection. I don't really care what anyone thinks. ALL OF MY WORK IS INSPECTED. Why do you guys always assume the worst. Do you have personal insurance. A Judge, and Jury could come after you if you did something stupid. Even if the company you work for has insurance..... There is more than one way to skin a cat.
Why so defensive, Robert? I just want you and your customers to be safe. Basically, think about it like this. You are performing work that the rest of us have to be licensed for and have years of training and Code beat into our heads to do. You on the other hand, are doing the same jobs, while apparently lacking the basic knowledge of where to look for the answers in the Code book. Like I said, there is a world of difference between a DIYer hacking his own stuff together, and a handyman charging money to hack someone else's stuff together.

I too have insurance, to "perform electrical wiring within buildings". Guess how much they would pay if I built a deck and it collapsed and killed someone?

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Old 03-16-2008, 06:09 PM   #27
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


You guys, and your arguing confuse me when it comes to code. Also most of the jobs I do you wouldn't touch. That is the way it is here in New York. I do have, and read the 2005 code book, and the 2008 changes. When you guys get going on code I look stuff up to see it. In New York or my area we don't need a license just an inspector. I don't need to study anything over 220/240 or worry about commercial electric or 3 phase, I will NEVER touch it. My insurance covers from dog bites to burning down someones house. Decks, roofs, windows, plumbing, septic systems, paint spilled on a carpet, or what ever. I'm not defensive just curious why you guys are. I do custom slaughtering, and butchering also.

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Old 03-17-2008, 07:10 PM   #28
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


I think it is telling that you sent me a nasty private message while not allowing private message responses. Coming to a Do It Yourself site to ask real electricians such basic questions, and then selling yourself and your lack of knowledge to an unsuspecting public, is fraudulent. You sir, are a hack.
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Old 03-17-2008, 10:01 PM   #29
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


Hate to dog pile on at this point but I have a few quick questions.

Why do people become certified electricians? I assume it is so they can legally do electrical work. Is there a penalty for practicing electricity without a license?
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Old 03-17-2008, 10:46 PM   #30
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Putting electrical fixtures in a shallow wall.


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Hate to dog pile on at this point but I have a few quick questions.

Why do people become certified electricians? I assume it is so they can legally do electrical work. Is there a penalty for practicing electricity without a license?
It depends on what the laws are in your area governing licensing. But generally, you can be ordered to cease and desist unlicensed electrical work, this first time. Then you may get a fine. If you cause a fire or kill someone due to your faulty unlicensed work, then you could serve time in jail.

We have licenses because bad electrical wiring causes people to die in horrible ways. The governments of our states have enacted laws saying that only qualified people should install and repair electrical systems and equipment. A license "proves" the qualification.

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