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Old 06-07-2012, 07:37 PM   #1
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Push In Connectors


I have previously used these push in wire connectors.



I have a two questions.

(1) Do they really take up less room then a conventional wire nut? Or is this only a perception?

(2) I have only used them on solid wires as it seem like you have to push quite hard to get them all the way into a "locked" position. The picture below shows stranded wires. How do you get stranded wires in them? Is there a tool?



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Old 06-11-2012, 07:54 AM   #2
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The only time I've seen this type of wiring device is in electrical products straight from the factory. That they use them tells me they are probably used for cost and speed.

And I have often had to reset the wires that came loose and have at times just taken them off completely and replaced them with a wire nut because they were junk.

If you're hell bent on using this type of device, I'd suggest checking with checking with local codes and seeing if they are approved for the application in which you intend to use them.

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Old 06-11-2012, 08:50 AM   #3
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Those connectors are very reliable. I have not had a callback for one of those yet.

You need to check the label to see if they can be used with stranded wire. Not all can and are for solid only.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
If you're hell bent on using this type of device, I'd suggest checking with checking with local codes and seeing if they are approved for the application in which you intend to use them.
DO you really think a local code making panel would specifically approve such items?

They are approved listed splices, so they are good to use. There might be a rare isolated area that would disallow them, but IMO this is doubtful.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:09 PM   #5
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Those connectors are very reliable. I have not had a callback for one of those yet.

You need to check the label to see if they can be used with stranded wire. Not all can and are for solid only.
Completely agree on both counts.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:46 PM   #6
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I've use the "Ideal" brand before, and the stranded wire has to be sufficiently stiff to push it in. When working with light fixtures, the stranded wire gauge is usually too small and flexible to work with the connectors, and I've had to use wire nuts.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:41 PM   #7
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They definitely seem to take up less space and be easier to use than wire nuts for connections involving many wires. For two-wire connections there doesn't seem to be much advantage. They have a bad reputation because their predecessor (which looked almost identical) about 20 years ago got recalled and caused huge problems because the connections loosened and overheated. That was bad. The new ones have shown no indication of this problem and seem totally reliable so far. Commercial electrical contractors are using them by the thousands without incident.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:31 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
They are approved listed splices, so they are good to use. There might be a rare isolated area that would disallow them, but IMO this is doubtful.
You should work here. I have had many an inspector disallow them. And the ones I've run across in the fixtures ARE junk. Some inspectors have required we remove them and hardwire them ourselves.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:41 PM   #9
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You should work here. I have had many an inspector disallow them. And the ones I've run across in the fixtures ARE junk. Some inspectors have required we remove them and hardwire them ourselves.
Code reference, they are listed-while I think they are junk also, name a section, UL or NEC for me to say fail.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:46 PM   #10
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I too would like to hear what article the inspector would cite. Or is it the "because I said so"?
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:07 PM   #11
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Quote:
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You should work here. I have had many an inspector disallow them. And the ones I've run across in the fixtures ARE junk. Some inspectors have required we remove them and hardwire them ourselves.
Seriously???

I agree with the others. I have a very low tolerance for inspectors that make s*it up.

Do you routinely do anything the inspector says without asking for a code reference? And please don't say it's just easier to do what they want. That is a sad excuse.
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Old 06-11-2012, 10:47 PM   #12
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I agree with this also and have posted my thoughts before. If it ain't on the code it ain't gonna happen. I work extremely hard to enforce the code as intended and written. I have no tolerance for amateurs and ignorant inspectors.
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Last edited by electures; 06-11-2012 at 11:44 PM.
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Old 06-11-2012, 11:40 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
You should work here. I have had many an inspector disallow them. And the ones I've run across in the fixtures ARE junk. Some inspectors have required we remove them and hardwire them ourselves.
Everything you've posted to be taken with a grain of salt by everyone else. You are in Chicago and everything in Chicago is backwards and done to make things more expensive and requires several different union trades to do anything! Someday maybe you guys will catch up with reality and not require conduit for residential use, allows things that have been standard everywhere else in the nation for decades and realize that unions are no longer better than anyone else.
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Old 06-11-2012, 11:49 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
Everything you've posted to be taken with a grain of salt by everyone else. You are in Chicago and everything in Chicago is backwards and done to make things more expensive and requires several different union trades to do anything! Someday maybe you guys will catch up with reality and not require conduit for residential use, allows things that have been standard everywhere else in the nation for decades and realize that unions are no longer better than anyone else.
Damn, I tried to "Thank" this post twice and it wouldn't let me.
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Old 06-12-2012, 12:23 AM   #15
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I agree with this also and have posted my thoughts before. If it ain't on the code it ain't gonna happen. I work extremely hard to enforce the code as intended and written. I have no tolerance for amateurs and ignorant inspectors.
My main reasons for asking an inspector about them would be to find out if the local jurisdiction has legally banned them or have others had problems with them.

IMO the "pinch" connection would not survive a dead short on a 20A breaker so if I left them in a fixture it would be the connection to only that fixture, not a feed-thru.

They're a close "cuzzin" to "back-stabbed receptacles which IMO are nothing but trouble, but are still legal w/ #14.

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