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Old 05-01-2012, 03:38 PM   #1
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PROS: What do you think about this?


I've only been here a short while but I've seen enough posts from non-professionals that are difficult to understand because they are not familiar with electrical terminology that I thought we needing something so they can better communicate with us what the problem is.

I created an image with the basic items you'd find in a house thinking if we all got together and created a thread to help the non-pros explain their problems we could ask for it to be a sticky requesting non-pros read it before asking their questions.

Let me know what you think and suggest any additions, changes, etc you think would help us help them.



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Old 05-01-2012, 03:40 PM   #2
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maybe show a GFCI 15A and 20A for completeness?

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Old 05-01-2012, 03:48 PM   #3
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great idea!

some suggestions for the diagram:
  1. expand the box section to include terms like single gang, double/two-gang, etc.
  2. suggest alternate abbreviations/names where applicable i.e. RGS for rigid galvanized steel conduit, load center vs. panel board vs breaker box, etc.
  3. 'outlet' vs 'receptacle' definition. doesn't help when you can purchase receptacles at stores that say 'outlet' on the packaging. technically not wrong but the terms become a problem, like afci requirements for outlets leads people to believe only those things you plug cords into need afci protection.
  4. similar issue for luminare vs lamp vs lampholder, etc.
  5. include hammerlane's schematics for wiring of three way switch, four way switch, switched receptacles, etc.
i'll post more when i think of them.
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:38 PM   #4
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PROS: What do you think about this?


For the "Large Appliance Cable", it says for dedicated 120/140-volt circuits. Are you sure you didn't mean 120/240?
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seansy59 View Post
For the "Large Appliance Cable", it says for dedicated 120/140-volt circuits. Are you sure you didn't mean 120/240?
And as far as I know it's not called "large appliance cable". It's NM, just in a larger size.
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:47 PM   #6
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GRC is usually just called "rigid". "Flex" can refer to quite a few different products with different applications. There's LFNC, FMC, LFMC, etc.
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:51 PM   #7
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Kudos, great idea. Ever think of writing a complete book?
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:55 PM   #8
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The single and multi conductor images and text came off the Internet. I didn't make any changes (lazy me!) And I wanted input from the pros here.
Quote:
GRC is usually just called "rigid". "Flex" can refer to quite a few different products with different applications. There's LFNC, FMC, LFMC, etc.
What I'm trying to do is find some terms we can all understand without getting too technical. We don't want to overwhelm those who come here looking for out help.

Here we call GRC "rigid" too but when I was bidding jobs throughout counties surrounding Chicago, GRC was universally understood. And I thought "Flex" is something the non-pro can easily understand. (Besides, it fit easier than something like "flexible metallic conduit" )

Whatever terms we use, I think we need to consider making it as easy as possible for the non-pro to understand. I keep hearing the words of an old-timer I worked with long ago when I was losing a customer with too much detail, "K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid."

I'll add GFCI & arc fault receptacles. I was wondering if we need to add range and dryer receptacles or are they rarely a problem? Once the final thread is created, we can create different posts and break down the basics like junction boxes.

I was also thinking of providing basic wiring diagrams so we can refer the non-pros to them when needed. Or we could just create a different thread or maybe not even go there at all. Whatever the pros here agree on is fine with me.

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Ever think of writing a complete book?
Yeah, I've tried many times. It's not what I was put here to do. I need tools in my hands!
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Old 05-01-2012, 07:59 PM   #9
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TANDEM BREAKER



2 (or double) POLE BREAKER



(Square D 2 Pole Breaker)



SINGLE POLE BREAKER

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Old 05-01-2012, 08:19 PM   #10
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Nice job. Would make a great "sticky."
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Old 05-01-2012, 08:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
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And I thought "Flex" is something the non-pro can easily understand. (Besides, it fit easier than something like "flexible metallic conduit" )
It is easy to understand, but it's not specific enough. The problem is that people say things like "I ran flex from the disconnect to my air conditioner. Is that OK?" And the answer is, "What kind of flex?" Or, "Do I need a ground wire in my flex?" Well, that depends on what kind and how long it is. Or, "Can I run flex under my soffit?" Almost every question involving "flex" requires more specificity to provide an answer, because they're not interchangeable.
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Old 05-01-2012, 09:20 PM   #12
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Improving communication?! Blasphemous, this is the internet!

I think this is an excellent idea, and a great start. I'd suggest adding that NM is often called Romex.

You might also want to consider having the start be a quick reference post, with links to following posts where more detail is provided. Such as all the different terms for conduit, basic wiring diagrams, burial depths, etc. That would also make it easy to add to later on.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:13 PM   #13
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The chart on the first post does not distinguish between "old work" and "new work" junction boxes. It just labels them as plastic and metal.
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:56 AM   #14
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Good post. I get a laugh when posters refer to a line coming in and two-lines going out. I think are we on a boating forum??

Last edited by hammerlane; 05-02-2012 at 06:02 AM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:02 AM   #15
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Here's a good one too:
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PROS: What do you think about this?-socket.jpg  

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