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Old 05-20-2012, 05:27 PM   #16
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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Originally Posted by Ravenworks View Post
If you are using a man lift to do this,I suggest that you run it for a while to get used to it.
This is what I'll be renting:
http://www.niftylift.com/usa/product...-cherry-picker

I'm certified with man lifts and bucket lifts. It's my OSHA certification and years as the safety supervisor on the job that is doing all the talking.

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We need to be clear on definitions here, 4160V is never classified as HV.
When it's enough to fry your innards, it's high voltage!

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Old 05-20-2012, 05:34 PM   #17
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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We need to be clear on definitions here, 4160V is never classified as HV.

This are common voltage classifications from IEEE:

Low is <1000V
Medium is 1000V - 69kV
High is 69kV - 230kV
Extra High is 230kV - 350kV
Ultra High is >350kV

Although other organizations will say LV is up to 2000V
As far as I know, that became official about 10 years ago.

Before that, it was fairly common to refer to low voltage as 600 and lower, medium as more than 600 but less than 35,000 and high was over 35,000.

I still refer to these voltages, mainly because of how wire is terminated.

low voltage is simply stripped and landed.

Medium voltage uses a termination kit that has several pieces and you strip the wire in several different steps.

High voltage uses oil-filled bushings.
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Old 05-20-2012, 05:42 PM   #18
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
This is what I'll be renting:
http://www.niftylift.com/usa/product...-cherry-picker

I'm certified with man lifts and bucket lifts. It's my OSHA certification and years as the safety supervisor on the job that is doing all the talking.
That lift will work for what you're going to do.

You'll need to be careful though, when you swing the bucket toward the building, the joint in the boom will swing toward the lines. Keeping it as low as possible will provide increased clearance.

If you keep it close to the building, it won't need to swing very far.

Depending on what type of soil you have and how wet it is, I'd use some pretty fair-sized pads under the outriggers. Especially the two that are closer to the lines.

Rob
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Old 05-20-2012, 07:25 PM   #19
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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Depending on what type of soil you have and how wet it is, I'd use some pretty fair-sized pads under the outriggers. Especially the two that are closer to the lines.

Rob
Use hard wood if you have it if not use 2x4's sandwiched between 3/4" plywood I wouldn't imagine the ground pressure would be high enough to worry about using soft wood backed with plywood.
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Old 05-20-2012, 07:31 PM   #20
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


Maybe you can call your power company and they can put some orange line hose on the high voltage conductors for you.
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Old 05-21-2012, 04:23 AM   #21
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Maybe you can call your power company and they can put some orange line hose on the high voltage conductors for you.
I think OP said the lines will be booted.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:57 AM   #22
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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I think OP said the lines will be booted.
Yes they will, or I'm not going up.

BTW, I took another look at the height of the poles and they look more like 30'. That means when I'm working on the peak of the house I will be about 4-5 feet away from the bare hot wire. That makes booting the wires a must.

Talking to guys I worked with, most seem to think the voltage per leg would be 7,200. That makes sense because that would create 12.8Kv between phases and that's the voltage that has come into every commercial building that I've done the vault work in.

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Use hard wood if you have it if not use 2x4's sandwiched between 3/4" plywood I wouldn't imagine the ground pressure would be high enough to worry about using soft wood backed with plywood.
Thanks for reminding me. I have a bunch of lumber from doing demo work on a shed and deck. I'll make up some pads today so I won't be tempted to just throw pieces of lumber under the feet tomorrow.

I'll be glad when this is done. Tomorrow looks like the start of a good weather window so I'll probably pick up the lift first thing in the morning. Wish me luck!
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Old 05-21-2012, 09:38 AM   #23
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So what do you guys do when faced with a situation like this? The only thing I can think of is to be awfully damned careful!
Carefully, plan every move and THINK!!
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:57 AM   #24
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Change of plans on the lift. I called to order the lift this morning. The guy told me moving the trailerable with manpower would "require three strong men", depending on the terrain. After we talked a bit I became convinced a self powered 4x4 lift was the way to go. Of course that means extra precaution when moving it along the power lines.

On the plus side, I'll probably get the work done a lot faster and won't need those three big strong men pushing me around.
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Old 05-21-2012, 12:34 PM   #25
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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The current in that arc [Iarc] in the video may not be too high. The helicopter has some small capacitance [C] to ground and so there is capacitive reactance [Xc] to ground.
Then Iarc = 500,000/Xc.

If C is 100 pF and f = 60 Hz then it's about 20 mA, which is just at the let-go point.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 05-21-2012 at 12:39 PM.
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Old 05-21-2012, 01:49 PM   #26
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


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Change of plans on the lift. I called to order the lift this morning. The guy told me moving the trailerable with manpower would "require three strong men", depending on the terrain. After we talked a bit I became convinced a self powered 4x4 lift was the way to go. Of course that means extra precaution when moving it along the power lines.

On the plus side, I'll probably get the work done a lot faster and won't need those three big strong men pushing me around.
You definately will do the work faster without having anyone to push you around.
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Old 05-21-2012, 04:07 PM   #27
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Work safe and wear your harness.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:33 PM   #28
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Pros: How do you feel about working around high voltage?


Not sure how experienced you are working with articulating cranes but one sure thing is to practice a lot before you actually get near the lines. The bucket tends to keep going for a matter of inches to a foot after you release the control. Height, ground stability and age of the equipment will impact this movement, more laterally than vertically. I've tapped a wall or two while trying to figure out the learning curve.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:39 AM   #29
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Yes, I know. I've worked on articulating booms as large as 60'. Every one has its own touch. This one just arrived and it's pretty small, compared to what I'm used to.

Still no word back from the power company on booting the lines. I was looking at them yesterday from the ground and they look to be at pretty much the same height as the peak of the house and from the ground it looks like 5'-6' of clearance. I'm hoping they get those booted before I need to get to that side of the house.

Well, gotta get started... on the other side.
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:40 AM   #30
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Yes but this is a DIY site. I cannot think of any scenario where an avid DIY person should ever touch anything greater than 240V. In fact I would rule out commercial 3Φ wiring for the DIYer as it different enough from 2Φ residential that dangerous things could happen.

As for voltages into the kV range don't even think about it. There is safety gear and safety procedure to follow with such wiring and is not a job for anyone but a crew of well experienced electricians who regularly work with such voltages. Know your limits.....

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