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-   -   Properly wiring my new 200a meter/panel (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/properly-wiring-my-new-200a-meter-panel-137797/)

socalsteve72 03-21-2012 08:39 PM

Properly wiring my new 200a meter/panel
 
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My new meter/main service panel has no ground bar only a neutral bar. I have been told that since it is the main (only) panel that this is fine. Does this mean that ALL ground and neutral wires to ALL circuits AND my ground rod should be connected to this neutral bar? Just doesn't seem right to me. I know that I can get/install a ground bar kit but it would be bonded to the neutral right? kinda seems redundant. I understand electricity but this is my first panel upgrade. any GOOD advice is appreciated.

jbfan 03-21-2012 08:42 PM

That is true for the first disconnect point, in this case your main panel.

You may have to put another ground bar just for the extra space.

SD515 03-21-2012 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 882543)
You may have to but another ground bar just for the extra space.

Good point jb. Also remember, you can't double-up neutrals under one screw. You usually can with the grounds. Check the panels label for that info.

rrolleston 03-21-2012 08:49 PM

Main panel or not I prefer my neutrals and grounds on separate bars.

socalsteve72 03-21-2012 08:56 PM

Here's the reason it seems so weird to me, what is the difference to bonding neutral & ground screws on an outlet, and doing it at the meter?
Just trying to understand...........:huh:

rrolleston 03-21-2012 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by socalsteve72 (Post 882557)
Here's the reason it seems so weird to me, what is the difference to bonding neutral & ground screws on an outlet, and doing it at the meter?
Just trying to understand...........:huh:

Ground should never carry any current.

socalsteve72 03-21-2012 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rrolleston (Post 882570)
Ground should never carry any current.

neutral should not carry current either, esp. when bonded to ground....?

Techy 03-21-2012 09:19 PM

neutral wires do carry current, back to the transformer.

jbfan 03-21-2012 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by socalsteve72 (Post 882575)
neutral should not carry current either, esp. when bonded to ground....?

Neutrals do carry current!:thumbsup:

k_buz 03-21-2012 09:48 PM

I'm sorry, I can't take it. There are certain things a homeowner can do on his own when it comes to electrical work, but replacing a main panel is not one of them.

How did you cut power to the old panel? How are you going to get it hooked back up? Is the service rated for 200 Amps? Most of the time (around here in WI) you will need a permit for the power company to make permanent connections. Around here, the only people that can pull permits for electrical are master electricians with the backing of a licensed and insured electrical contractor.

rrolleston 03-21-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 882599)
I'm sorry, I can't take it. There are certain things a homeowner can do on his own when it comes to electrical work, but replacing a main panel is not one of them.

How did you cut power to the old panel? How are you going to get it hooked back up? Is the service rated for 200 Amps? Most of the time (around here in WI) you will need a permit for the power company to make permanent connections. Around here, the only people that can pull permits for electrical are master electricians with the backing of a licensed and insured electrical contractor.

:laughing::whistling2:

Not all areas require that and after inspection the power company will come out and connect the new service and install a meter.

socalsteve72 03-21-2012 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Techy (Post 882577)
neutral wires do carry current, back to the transformer.

First off. I do understand the theory (ac power) and am certified in DC electrical (vehicles) and have a broad construction knowledge 20+ years. so running wiring , determining loads, proper connections ect. is actually pretty basic.
I am a homeowner that is upgrading my own service (as allowed) and DID pull proper permits and WILL pass inspection. HOWEVER I am just trying to wrap my head around the fact that current is able to go back to the transformer, on the neutral bar, while being bonded to ground. Understand?

k_buz 03-21-2012 10:42 PM

Are you installing/replacing the main grounding system?

SD515 03-21-2012 11:00 PM

The neutral conductor is providing the 'return' path back to the transformer. Bonding the neutral to the 'ground' at the main does a fews things. The grounds of the branch circuits and feeders that are fed by the main now have a path back to the transformer also. This will make overcurrent devices operate if there is a ground fault. Bonding the neutral conductor to the grounding electrodes via the grounding electrode conductor(s) will help stabilize the system voltage, and help protect the system from high voltage surges, like lightning.

socalsteve72 03-21-2012 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 882650)
Are you installing/replacing the main grounding system?

Installing all new ground system ( ground rod and cold water bond) and panel upgrade/relocation


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