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-   -   Proper install of shared neutral (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/proper-install-shared-neutral-183407/)

benleef 07-10-2013 03:12 PM

Proper install of shared neutral
 
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I have a sub panel in my garage. From panel I have 12/3 to an outlet powering only my fridge. One of the hots (red) is capped off at the outlet and the panel.

I am getting a kegerator to put next to the fridge and was thinking this should be on a separate circuit. My plan was to run 12/2 from the fridge outlet, using the red hot, switching out the breaker in the panel for a double breaker, and sharing the neutrals.

Is this the correct way to do it? I'm pretty sure I have to pigtail the neutrals at each outlet location and otherwise I'm good to go....

Speedy Petey 07-10-2013 03:19 PM

You have it right. Especially about the two-pole breaker.

Don't forget, these receptacle must be GFI protected. You can use GFI receptacles ($), or you would need to use a two-pole GFI breaker ($$$).

benleef 07-10-2013 03:27 PM

Thanks. Do they need to be GFI even though dedicated circuit behind the appliance. All my other outlets are GFI protected in the garage except for my fridge one. I've heard that refrigerators may have a tendency to cause nuisance trips on gfi outlets.

Speedy Petey 07-10-2013 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benleef (Post 1214271)
Thanks. Do they need to be GFI even though dedicated circuit behind the appliance. All my other outlets are GFI protected in the garage except for my fridge one. I've heard that refrigerators may have a tendency to cause nuisance trips on gfi outlets.

The old exception for large appliances was removed several code cycles ago. The new one at the least will need to be GFI.
GFI's and appliances have come a long way. If a refer or freezer trips a GFI today there is a reason for it. Nuisance trips are pretty rare.

benleef 07-10-2013 03:56 PM

Thanks! Look like I'm going to have to spend a little money on some gfi outlets

av-geek 07-10-2013 09:55 PM

Purchase on single GFI outlet, and place it at the beginning of the "daisy chain" of outlets. This one GFI will protect all other outlets in the chain that are connected to the "load" terminals on the GFI outlet. This is a good idea too, as placing a GFI outlet behind a fridge means that if it trips, you would end up having to move the fridge to reset it.

jbfan 07-10-2013 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by av-geek (Post 1214396)
Purchase on single GFI outlet, and place it at the beginning of the "daisy chain" of outlets. This one GFI will protect all other outlets in the chain that are connected to the "load" terminals on the GFI outlet. This is a good idea too, as placing a GFI outlet behind a fridge means that if it trips, you would end up having to move the fridge to reset it.

Can't do that with a MWBC.

benleef 08-05-2013 10:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 1214415)
Can't do that with a MWBC.

So each receptacle needs its own GFI outlet correct? Essentially, nothing can be connected to the load side of the outlet because of the shared neutral?

Jim Port 08-05-2013 10:37 AM

If wired as shown, you can use 2 GFI receptacles and it will work.

sirsparksalot 08-05-2013 10:44 AM

benleef, I wasn't aware of the GFCI requirements for refrigerator circuits, but Speedy and jbfan know their stuff.

I would think that you're correct that both need individual GFCI receptacles, and that you shouldn't use the Load side to feed other receptacles.

sirsparksalot 08-05-2013 10:50 AM

Jim and I posted roughly same time. He knows his chit too :D

Oso954 08-05-2013 11:34 AM

Quote:

I wasn't aware of the GFCI requirements for refrigerator circuits,
Remember that the discussion was about a refrigerator circuit in a garage.

I believe that there is still an exception (no GFCI requirement) for a refrigerator in the kitchen of a house or apartment.

Pro's, please correct me if I am wrong on that one.

Jim Port 08-05-2013 12:21 PM

That exception was removed from the NEC. Now all including the garage door opener receptacle require GFI protection.

benleef 08-05-2013 12:42 PM

Thanks for the help all.

electures 08-05-2013 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port
That exception was removed from the NEC. Now all including the garage door opener receptacle require GFI protection.

Unless you live in New Jersey.


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