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mlupa 12-04-2008 04:27 PM

preferred outlet box type & work order
 
What is the current preferred choice of outlet box nowadays with electricians? when I first an earlier house 15 years ago it was the metal box with romex clips etc. Nowadays I see a lot of the blue plastic boxes with the self-clamping wire insert. I still like to attach my boxes to a stud vs. clamped to just drywall which I also see a lot of now as well.
I also want to know the right order for securing the box when drywalling - I used to secure the box and the do the drywall with a cutout - but it seems like the faster why is to drywall the box in and then cut out and fish for the box -
Any guidance would help since I have stripped down 4 rooms and am redoing the electrical and drywall...
I am using 14 gauge wire

Gigs 12-04-2008 05:05 PM

Quote:

Any guidance would help .. I am using 14 gauge wire
Don't do this. For lighting-only circuits, sure... Outlets, run 12.

rgsgww 12-04-2008 05:25 PM

You can use 14...if you have it in place then don't go pulling it out...any new rooms you can use 12.

I'm not an electrician but I do know that when building or remodeling, people do the wiring first, then put the dry wall up.

mlupa 12-04-2008 08:53 PM

12 used to be code around here 10-15 yrs ago, I know it is now 14 so not worried about that to be honest. Wrt to the drywall/outlet order what I really meant was whether or not I should secure the outlets first and then put up the drywall around it - or just leave the wire/box dangling and then go fish the box after the drywall is up..

Gigs 12-04-2008 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mlupa (Post 194047)
12 used to be code around here 10-15 yrs ago, I know it is now 14

That doesn't make much sense. In any case, you'll only be able to use 15 amp breakers with 14 gauge wire.

mlupa 12-04-2008 09:05 PM

Yes - most of my breakers other than the appliances are 15 amp. If I recall correctly outlets and light switches all used to be sized for 12/2 years ago; now the standard cheapies are sized to 14 and you pay a nice premium for 12 - it did not used to be that way. My kitchen in another house was just re-done and the electrician used 14 for all of the non-appliance work. So I guess i may have been taugh otherwise by example...

chris75 12-04-2008 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gigs (Post 193928)
Don't do this. For lighting-only circuits, sure... Outlets, run 12.


Why? :confused1:

Gigs 12-04-2008 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris75 (Post 194063)
Why? :confused1:

We were just talking about computers that pull 1500 watts in another thread. Space heaters are another good reason.

Yet another reason is you can just buy 1000 feet of 12/2 and not have to buy two different sizes. It's much cheaper to buy 1000 feet than a couple small rolls.

Termite 12-04-2008 11:11 PM

Just to be clear...

14ga wire is not "code" across the board in your area, or any area for that matter. The national electric code does not permit 14ga wiring for everything in a home. Specifically, your kitchen receptacles must be 20 amps and therefore must be fed with 12ga.

Although many people advocate it, there is not a requirement for 12ga wiring/20 amp circuits on general use receptacle circuits in bedrooms, living rooms, etc.

15 amp breakers....14 gauge wire
20 amp breakers....12 gauge wire

Your switches and receptacles are not "sized" for 14 gauge wire and not 12. If you're using the stabs in the back of the receptacles/switches, then 12 may not fit....But using the stabs is a crumby practice in many peoples' opinion (including mine).

mlupa 12-04-2008 11:21 PM

OK - all real interesting feedback in the 12 vs 14 wars and I guess 12 is the safer no-thinking approach as long as you dont mind the extra muscle required to handle the wire.

Now - still curious if anyone has any opinions on the original question that I asked? regarding outlet boxes and securing prior to drywall installation? :)

theatretch85 12-05-2008 12:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mlupa (Post 194119)
Now - still curious if anyone has any opinions on the original question that I asked? regarding outlet boxes and securing prior to drywall installation? :)

Yes. Get one of these!
http://www.courant.com/features/home...0,472895.story

J. V. 12-06-2008 12:17 PM

If your walls are open (preferable), get plastic nail in boxes. They have the nails already installed. You just hold the box to the stud and drive the two nails in. Very secure. The plastic boxes have openings with one way tabs in them. You push the wire in, but you can only pull it out by pushing the tab clear of the cable. No connectors required.

jerryh3 12-06-2008 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 194129)

That's funny. Just learn how to cut out the boxes with a keyhole saw.

chris75 12-06-2008 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gigs (Post 194080)
We were just talking about computers that pull 1500 watts in another thread. Space heaters are another good reason.

So how is # 12 going to solve that problem? :whistling2: I've been doing this way to long for you to convince me. so dont bother... :)

Jim Port 12-06-2008 08:56 PM

At least in my experience the walls are open and the boxes ane installed. The inspector wants to see the ground made up on the rough-in inspection. After inspection then the insulation and drywall is installed.

Why use an old work box at several times the cost of a new nail-on box?


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