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POWER STROKE 03-19-2013 03:21 PM

Power Vent Water Heater
 
I am wanting to change out my old water heater and replace it with a new Power vent water heater. I just have one question is it good to run a 14/2 wire with a 15amp breaker with a GFCI or is better to run a 12/2 wire with a 20amp breaker with a GFCI. Thanks in advance for any help or input.

TarheelTerp 03-19-2013 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by POWER STROKE (Post 1140929)
I am wanting to change out my old water heater and replace it with a new Power vent water heater.

Will you be able to make hot water when the power is off?

Toller 03-19-2013 03:54 PM

In general I like to run 12/2 so you have it if you ever need it.
My water heater is only 2a (iirc) so it doesn't matter what breaker you used with it.

Why do you want a GFCI? Mine isn't, and unless there is a new code requirement I don't know about, I would say it is highly undesirable.

stickboy1375 03-19-2013 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toller (Post 1140955)
I
Why do you want a GFCI? Mine isn't, and unless there is a new code requirement I don't know about, I would say it is highly undesirable.

I would ask how the unit is wired and the location of the unit before saying it is undesirable. If it is a cord and plug unit and located in a unfinished basement, then it would be VERY desirable.

Toller 03-19-2013 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 1140956)
I would ask how the unit is wired and the location of the unit before saying it is undesirable. If it is a cord and plug unit and located in a unfinished basement, then it would be VERY desirable.

Why? Doesn't seem particularly dangerous (especially since no one ever touches a water heater) and I'd rather not have my water heater go off because of a flakey GFCI.

stickboy1375 03-19-2013 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toller (Post 1141021)
Why? Doesn't seem particularly dangerous (especially since no one ever touches a water heater) and I'd rather not have my water heater go off because of a flakey GFCI.

GFCI's are not flakey, and its code for a reason. If you dont understand the code then I suggest not answering in a manner that bypasses important code requirements.

stickboy1375 03-19-2013 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toller (Post 1141021)
Why? Doesn't seem particularly dangerous (especially since no one ever touches a water heater) and I'd rather not have my water heater go off because of a flakey GFCI.

I dont even know how to respond to " no one ever touches a water heater"

Jim Port 03-19-2013 06:49 PM

If the receptacle is in an unfinished basement it would require GFI protection.

POWER STROKE 03-19-2013 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toller (Post 1140955)
In general I like to run 12/2 so you have it if you ever need it.
My water heater is only 2a (iirc) so it doesn't matter what breaker you used with it.

Why do you want a GFCI? Mine isn't, and unless there is a new code requirement I don't know about, I would say it is highly undesirable.

Yea it's a new code that passed in 2008 all basement and garage receps have to be GFCI

Toller 03-19-2013 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 1141022)
GFCI's are not flakey, and its code for a reason. If you dont understand the code then I suggest not answering in a manner that bypasses important code requirements.

I specifically said unless it was a new code requirement, and someone pointed out it was new in 2008.

And sure, they are flakey.
I can go a year without touching my waterheater, and floor lamp that I touch several times a day has a much higher potential for being dangerous on a ground fault then a water heater. So it is rather hard to see them as dangerous.

If you don't know how to read then I suggest not answering in any manner.

Jim Port 03-19-2013 08:00 PM

I would hard say GFI's are flakey. They have proven to be reliable for many years.

HVACTECH96 03-19-2013 08:07 PM

Isn't the copper piping connected to the water heater,also connected to grounds and neutrals,which in turn is connected to the floor lamp that is touched every day?

Jim Port 03-20-2013 06:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by POWER STROKE (Post 1141074)
Yea it's a new code that passed in 2008 all basement and garage receps have to be GFCI

Prior to the change there were a few exceptions for stuff like alarm panels and equipment plugged into single receptacles and ones in a dedicated space like behind a freezer. Otherwise unfinished basement receptacles have needed GFI protection before 2008.

kbsparky 03-20-2013 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 1141095)
I would hard say GFI's are flakey. They have proven to be reliable for many years.

They certainly can be flaky. Try testing `em after a bad lightning storm has blown through.

We get more bad GFI reports after such events.

mj12 03-20-2013 08:24 AM

Is a gas water heater with power vent considered a water source, requiring a gfi?


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