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Old 12-21-2011, 02:35 PM   #1
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Power for a sub-panel


If I want to put more than 60 amp into a sub-panel, how can it be done..?

I want to put a 100 amp sub in the shop and with a welder, air compressor and electric heaters I don't think a breaker in the main panel can provide what I need.

Help.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:39 PM   #2
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Power for a sub-panel


Depends on what size main panel you have, if there's 2, slots in the panel avalible.
Your also going to have to upgrade the wiring going to the shed.

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Old 12-21-2011, 02:46 PM   #3
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Power for a sub-panel


Hi Joe,

I've got 200 amp main box with room for about a dozen more breakers. Currently the shed has no power except for an extension cord from the house. A portable generator is powering the welder but now that it's cold outside and exhauste fumes can't get out past the closed door....
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:50 PM   #4
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Power for a sub-panel


I don't really understand the question, if there is space in the panel get a double poll 100a. Or are you asking how to install a sub?
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:13 PM   #5
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Power for a sub-panel


The largest double breaker I've seen was 60 amps.

A double 100 breaker would solve my problem.

I will have to do a google search for the BIG BREAKER...

Thanks for your help Julius, I appreciate it a bunch....!
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:18 PM   #6
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Power for a sub-panel


What brand of panel do you have?

The breakers larger than 60 Amps are more expensive -- and as a result -- are kept in a separate place in most home-horror stores.

You have to ask for `em.
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:19 PM   #7
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Power for a sub-panel


Try home depot they usually have
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:03 PM   #8
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Power for a sub-panel


This breaker box is on the power pole next to the house and feeds (under ground) a smaller panel in the kitchen.
It's a Cutler-Hammer model # BR2040B200R and other than the single 30 amp breaker I installed for an RV duplex outlet, the panel is vacant below the 200 amp main breaker.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:24 PM   #9
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Power for a sub-panel


HD & Lowes, about $40

http://www.homedepot.com/Electrical-...&storeId=10051

http://www.lowes.com/pd_103015-82364...&storeId=10151
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:37 PM   #10
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Power for a sub-panel


Thanks Kyle,

I saw HD had both a CH2100 and CH2100CS.
What's the difference.? and what does the 'CS' mean..??

Thanks for your help.
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:35 PM   #11
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Power for a sub-panel


You said you have a ‘BR’ panel. Eaton list a BR2100 (10kAIC) or a BRH2100 (22kAIC) that fits your panel. CH breakers are another one of their models they make. They don’t interchange.

CS=clamshell (packaging)
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Old 12-21-2011, 10:09 PM   #12
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Power for a sub-panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by SD515 View Post
You said you have a ĎBRí panel. Eaton list a BR2100 (10kAIC) or a BRH2100 (22kAIC) that fits your panel. CH breakers are another one of their models they make. They donít interchange.

CS=clamshell (packaging)
Thanks again Kyle,

I do have a 'BR' panel and wasn't paying attention and focused only on the CS. That's why I joined this board, cuz life is tough on us with only 2 remaining braincells....

You saved me a bunch of money for gas running back & forth to HD's exchange dept.

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Old 12-21-2011, 10:16 PM   #13
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Power for a sub-panel


Lol. Jim Port would say I picked the wrong day to quit sniffing glue (inside joke…I’m sure he’ll see it).

Stick around, ask questions, and contribute. There are some excellent trades people and DIYers on this website.
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Old 12-22-2011, 10:42 AM   #14
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Power for a sub-panel


OK, next redundant question:

After reading several threads I understand that feeding this sub-panel through buried PVC I will need individual wires (THWN or XHHW) of proper size and I was planning on grounding rods.

So is a ground wire from sub to main panel a must and without one is bonding the neutral in this sub still a definite NO NO...?

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Old 12-22-2011, 11:15 AM   #15
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Power for a sub-panel


Bonding the neutral to the ground on any subpanel is a no-no. If the shed where the subpanel is located is detached from your house you will need to install a ground rod at the location.

You will still need 3 conductors and a ground going in between your main panel and your detached garage.

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