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Old 03-16-2008, 07:35 AM   #1
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Power Meter Pull


Is it possible to pull the power meter w/o having the power company disconnecting service to the home?

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Old 03-16-2008, 07:44 AM   #2
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Yes, if you are into breaking the law and risking your life.
And YES, I AM serious!

Call the POCO and they will come out and do it for you.

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Old 03-16-2008, 12:11 PM   #3
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Around here (Northern Nevada), if you need a meter pulled for any reason, just call the POCO. They'll send a troubleman out, he'll pull the meter, and when you need it back in, call them again, they come back out, test the socket (for short circuits and grouind faults), and put the meter back in.

I've never had any of them ask for a permit, call the building department, or anything. They just do what they're asked. No charge, either. Very simple.

Rob

Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 02-10-2010 at 08:51 PM. Reason: removed possible incorrect info
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Old 03-16-2008, 12:27 PM   #4
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Here in New York if they pull a meter they won't put it back in until the work is inspected.
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Old 03-16-2008, 01:12 PM   #5
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Thank you for the insight... sounds simple enough to just make the call. One more thing anyone know how you can tell what the Amp rating is on a Duncan meter?
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Old 03-16-2008, 01:27 PM   #6
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Depending on its age, on the face there's a bunch of letters and numbers. If one of them is 'CL', that's the number of amps it's good for. If it's 'CL10' or 'CL20', then you have a larger service that uses CT's. Usually over 200 amps. Most residential meters are class (CL) 100 or 200.

This is just the rating of the meter itself, not the rating of the service.

Rob
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Old 03-16-2008, 01:35 PM   #7
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The amp rating of the actual meter itself is totally meaningless.
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Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
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Old 03-16-2008, 09:29 PM   #8
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Isn't the Main breaker load center suppose to be rated the same amperage as the meter? Or am I way off on that?

Last edited by VitaleSB; 03-16-2008 at 10:44 PM.
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Old 02-10-2010, 02:54 PM   #9
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Please do not state something is a Federal crime unless you can back it up with source/more information
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:01 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
From what I've read in other forums, pulling a meter can not only be catistrophic (if not done correctly) but is also a FEDERAL crime.
Please list your source for stating this is a FEDERAL crime
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by spark plug View Post
But if the original panel is full, you might have some issues with CTL (circuit limiting. In other words, you might overload the capacity of the bus bars and other contacts to handle the loads safely.!
Wait a minute, let me backup and ask about this a little different.

Shouldn't the 100 amp main breaker take care of this?

In other words, ASSUMING the panel is rated for 100 amps, and the panel is protected by a 100 amp main breaker, why would you need to worry about the capacity of the bus bars and contacts?
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:45 PM   #12
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Please list your source for stating this is a FEDERAL crime
I tried, but I can't find the page I recently came across on the subject. I seem to recall doing some research on generators and transfer switches. I was running across posts (outside of DIY Chatroom) where people were telling others to pull their own meter. There were some responses that claimed that if you do not properly pull a meter, that it can explode, and at least one poster that claimed that is was a crime for a home-owner to pull his own meter, and that this wasn't going to only be a local or state law (therefore it would have to be something at the federal level).

Of course it also could have been one of those "obtuse" claims... perhaps not that its a "federal" crime to remove your meter, but that a POCO could come after you if they wanted under some sort of federal fraud charges.


In any case, the obvious point is that home owners shouldn't go pulling their meters.

From what else I've read, is sounds like many POCO will happily pull the meter for you, and do it for no charge (assuming you can wait on THEIR time table).
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:49 PM   #13
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Pulling a meter is not a crime as far as I know (for a Pro)
Electricians do it all the time & in many areas its perfectly normal
Arc Flash is the biggest problem
As well as possibly touching the unfused service feed

I'd never try it myself & I would not recommend any Homeowner attempt it

Stealing power IS a crime

Again...what Federal Fraud charges
You continue to post this without ANY backup whatsover
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Old 02-10-2010, 04:34 PM   #14
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Power Meter Pull


Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
Can't that be handled with a load calculation... basically ensure that we indeed are not going to need more than 100 amps?
Yes. But the average beginning DIY'er is not equipped to handle load calculations and demand factor (i.e. continuous load, etc.) and other unexpected problems that pop up. !
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Old 02-10-2010, 04:34 PM   #15
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Actually I'm pretty sure you can't
There are limits on what you can connect to the bus
Attaching a 200a breaker on a 100a bus would violate code
I'm not going to claim that you are wrong about this... but can you site a code reference that indicates this?

I'm sincerly asking because I have been looking over some of the NEC 2008 text and can't find anything specific.

I can find all sorts of references to making sure that nothing is down stream of an over current protection device that is rated LESS than the protection device (i.e. you can't use a 200a breaker to source a sub-panel rated for only 100a, unless the sub-panel itself provides 100a over current protection from the feeder).

But I can't find anything that says you can't have an over current protection device that is rated MORE than an upstream protection device.

From what I've read in the code, if your main panel has feed-through lugs, and those feed-through lugs are protected by the main circuit breaker, that you can feed a sub-panel from the feed-through lugs without any additional protection, so long as the sub-panel is not rated LESS than the main circuit breaker.

If I'm right about that, then using a 200a circuit breaker to tap into a 100a main panel isn't any different than using feed-through lugs.

Now I'll admit that there is most likely an L&L limitation where the manufacturer might be preventing you from placing a 200a breaker anywhere within a 100a panel. But otherwise, I can't find anything (yet) in code that would proclude the use of a 200a breaker that's already protected by a 100a main.

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