Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-20-2012, 09:08 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 65
Rewards Points: 75
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


hi,
we are installing a Panasonic 08VKML2 fan, The wriing instructions call for each of three blacks (fan, nite lite, fluorescent lite) to be connected to switchable power. This fixture also has one ground. However, when any or all of the blacks are connected (and the switch or switches are turned ON), we get 120V and enough current to peg my small meter (e.g. > 150mOhm). is it common for the neutral to carry signifiant current?
Thansk, Steve

Steve Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 09:23 PM   #2
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,368
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


You should never be measuring ohms on live circuits.

You can destroy the meter.

__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 09:46 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Md/Pa
Posts: 1,142
Rewards Points: 640
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


You mentioned current, voltage, and ohms so I'm not at all sure what you are trying to measure. If in fact you are measuring current on the neutral the answer is yes. There will be just as much current on the neutral as the hots but I don't understand why you would want to measure this.
zappa is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 09:57 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 65
Rewards Points: 75
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


oops..my bad and apologies to both of you. I measured current, not Ohms (total brain fart here). Anyway the meter pegs at 150mAmps.

Does it make sense that there is 120 Volts and >>150mAmps on the neutral coming from the fan?

Thank you, Steve
Steve Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 10:01 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 78
Rewards Points: 75
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


The neutral is the return path for current. If you connect the hot and leave the neutral disconnected, of course you're going to have 120v across the open in the circuit. Once you connect the ammeter, it completes the circuit and current flows.
fdiddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 10:05 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Md/Pa
Posts: 1,142
Rewards Points: 640
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Burke View Post
oops..my bad and apologies to both of you. I measured current, not Ohms (total brain fart here). Anyway the meter pegs at 150mAmps.

Does it make sense that there is 120 Volts and >>150mAmps on the neutral coming from the fan?

Thank you, Steve
150ma is only .15 amps so yes, it should peg and possibly destroy your meter. But why are you worried about current? And where are you measuring the 120 volts?
zappa is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2012, 12:23 AM   #7
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,557
Rewards Points: 2,010
Default

power and current on panasonic fan neutral


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Burke View Post
oops..my bad and apologies to both of you. I measured current, not Ohms (total brain fart here). Anyway the meter pegs at 150mAmps.

Does it make sense that there is 120 Volts and >>150mAmps on the neutral coming from the fan?

Thank you, Steve
Please stop trying to measure things with your meter until you understand what you're doing. You can destroy the meter and possibly injure yourself.

There is practically no reason to ever use a 150mA meter on an AC line circuit. Not under usual circumstances at least. IMO, using a multimeter for current measurements on AC circuits is not an appropriate procedure for most DIYers - it requires working hot with open connections and two hands on the equipment. In fact, pro's rarely ever do this these days and OSHA and the NFPA prohibit it without extra safety precautions. The standard tool for current measurements is a clamp-on ammeter which is vastly safer and easier to use.

What, exactly, are you trying to measure and why? We can work from there.

mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why can't you connect Ground/Neutral bus bars on a sub secutanudu Electrical 42 11-07-2012 01:33 PM
Tripping breakers,neutrals,120 volts and 240 volts OH My!!! Stubbie Electrical 17 06-11-2011 06:09 AM
Will reverse polarity trip breaker?? Duane 70 Electrical 60 12-05-2008 10:18 PM
hooking up dryer....bronx ny code SURFBUG Appliances 6 10-14-2008 09:41 PM
Nuetral from feeder cable to main panel question? TW Lucas Electrical 14 05-08-2008 11:33 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.