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Old 01-03-2011, 05:47 PM   #1
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


Can I use this in a standard, 20 amp, 12 gage GFCI outlet???

http://www.marey.com/detallesi.php?c...14&codigoc=10#

  • Voltage: 110V
  • Power: 3.2 kW
  • Amperage: HIGH 23.5 A - LOW 16 A
"national electric code (NEC) specifies that 12 guage wire has a maximum rating of 25 amp"

IF I only plan on using the lower, summer setting, in your pro opinions, would this be an acceptable and safe device to simply plug into a GFCI 20 amp, 12 gage bathroom outlet, without having to re-wire anything?

Also, if for some reason a guest were set to the higher, winter setting, pushing the 23.5 load, would you still think it's safe? I mean, if 12 gage wire can take up to 25 amps, and this pushes 23.5, would this wire get hotter and hotter the longer the heater is in use? Or should it be ok. (Please, I am not asking if it's legal, only acceptably safe to use.)

I am more than willing to only use it on the lower, summer setting. I'd like to know if both settings, only one, or neither settings are safe to use.

Feedback, please?


Last edited by Freshbrood; 01-03-2011 at 05:58 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 01-03-2011, 05:53 PM   #2
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


Quote:
Originally Posted by Freshbrood View Post
http://www.marey.com/detallesi.php?c...14&codigoc=10#

  • Voltage: 110V
  • Power: 3.2 kW
  • Amperage: HIGH 23.5 A - LOW 16 A

IF I only plan on using the lower, summer setting, in your pro opinions, would this be an acceptable device to simply plug into a GFCI 20 amp, 12 gage bathroom outlet?

If, for some reason, it were set to the higher, winter setting, pushing the 23.5 load, would you still think it's safe? I am happy to stick to using only the lower setting, if you guys tell me you think it should be safe if only left on the lower setting.

Feedback, please?
Is this the same thing as the prior posts ??

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Old 01-03-2011, 06:22 PM   #3
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Is this the same thing as the prior posts ??

No Scuba Dave, it's not.. and please forgive me if I'm posting in the wrong section.. This seemed like the right place to start.

I'm not sure why it cut off the first sentence, but I wanted to know if I can plug this into a standard 12 gage, 20 amp rated GFCI bathroom outlet safely. I recall the NEC saying those outlets actually have a max of 23.5/25 amps. Im not sure. Either way, I can live with the lower setting, if you tell me it's safe to just plug in without re-wiring.

It's a point-of-use shower head heater. It only warms a very small amount of water from the shower head. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated and desperately needed. Thanks.

Last edited by Freshbrood; 01-03-2011 at 06:25 PM. Reason: Additional info
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:25 PM   #4
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


I moved the question to a new thread
When you add on to an existing thread many people will look at the original question

Where are you located ?

In the US you would need to wire this to meet its Max demand
That product/sales location is San Juan, PR
Not even sure you can legally use that in the US
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Is this the same thing as the prior posts ??
Im located in Miami, Florida. I don't own my home, I live in a foreclosed property. I am a college student, and I have no landlord to repair these things. It's all me.. so I really dont want to pay too much to have an electrician permanently repair or re-wire anything.. and I can't ask the bank to fix it- I'm lucky they dont kick me out yet.

Please, I only want to know if you think I could safely use this.. and if so, under what conditions? Only the lower setting? Only for brief showers? Or not at all? Im not concerned about the legality of it.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:35 PM   #6
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


I doubt it has a listing to be used in the US
That costs quite a bit of $$ to have an item tested
Putting an electric heater in the shower with a switch is not something I would try
I do not think it would be safe
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:39 PM   #7
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I thought technically Puerto Rico is a US territory, although I have no idea what kind of building codes and laws they have..

but if the stats are accurate, why would it not be safe, plugged into a GFCI Bathroom outlet? I understand you don't want to say "yeah kid, seems fine, go for it", then hear about me electrocuted on the nightly news a week later.. but assuming the numbers are accurate, and not mislabeled, shouldnt it be ok to use, on the lower setting at least?

BTW, their website now says they have a new American warehouse.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:51 PM   #8
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Electric items that plug in are not usually allowed in the shower area...for good reason
Lights have to be UL listed & must be rated for wet use
I do not see any specifications on this item as far as its meeting any US requirements
Do you really want to risk getting electrocuted ?
Not me.....

It does appear PR has accepted NEC 2008 as of 2010
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:53 PM   #9
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


PDF instructions sate a 30 amp circuit is required.
I could not find a ul listing on this product.
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:03 PM   #10
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Well, Im desperate, and broke.

The switch on the side is a hi/low switch. The on/off is regulated by the flow of the water itself, so all I ever have to touch are the faucets in the tub. I lived in Bogota, Colombia for several months, and these type of point-of-use shower head heaters are extremely common all over south America, from what I understand and from personal shower experience there. The electronics are all situated above the incomming water input. I dunno. I might just chance it.

Aside from potential risk of electric shock- do you think it would melt the wires behind my wall outlet, if used on the lower setting? My biggest concern is an outlet or wall electrical fire from overheating, not electrocution.

Last edited by Freshbrood; 01-03-2011 at 07:04 PM. Reason: misspelling
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:14 PM   #11
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Point-of-use shower head heater power use


Quote:
Originally Posted by Freshbrood View Post
Aside from potential risk of electric shock- do you think it would melt the wires behind my wall outlet, if used on the lower setting? My biggest concern is an outlet or wall electrical fire from overheating, not electrocution.
Well with a comment like that; your not worried about your safety or anyone elses so I'm pretty sure no one on here will help you.
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:15 PM   #12
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If used on the higher setting it should trip the breaker
If it doesn't then there is a chance of overheating the wires
Without a UL listing which checks the device to US standards I doubt there will be anyone here that will tell you to use it
Even on the low setting
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:19 PM   #13
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Thank you Dave. I appreciate your honesty and thoughtful, honest answers.

Wish me luck.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:36 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freshbrood View Post
Thank you! Finally a direct answer. Exactly what I suspected, but just wanted to hear from someone in the know. Although they say not to use with extension cords, I'm considering using a high-quality GFCI short extension cord as an added measure- then there are 2 GFCI switches for saftey, in case one fails. What do you think? A grounded GFCI extension more safe/less safe? And of course, I will only use the low setting.
Extension cords are made of stranded (not solid) copper and will cause some voltage drop depending on the length, which will increase the amp draw of the unit. Also, extension cords tend to be most #14 or #18 wire, instead of #12. Use can get a contractor's grade #12 cord, but it will probably only be rated for about 15-16A. Extension cords do not have same fire rating as romex, so if the cord overheats, it will likely fail much faster than romex (the potential to start a fire through an extension cord before the circuit breaker trips is very real).

I would not use an extension cord of any type with this appliance.

Quite frankly, this is a *bad* idea overall. You said you are in living a foreclosure... the bank will have you for lunch if burn down their building. I like a hot shower as much as the next guy, but not enough to risk my life and my belongings to get it.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:39 AM   #15
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No extension cord it is then. I will double check the circuit before each and every shower. And as far as the bank knows, the thing was in the house before I ever moved in.

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