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Fatalist 08-27-2008 05:49 AM

Please help with lighting project?
 
I found this post,and this person is obviously wanting to do the same thing as I am.
"
You're talking to a major newbie here (someone who should probably not mess around with this stuff! But I'm on a mission!). I have a very dark "cupboard" in my kitchen. It really needs a light in there. I would like to hang a light that I have - but it is the kind that is hard wired. I have a plug kit that would work and I would like to convert the light to be able to plug it into a socket. My question is this - Is it as simple as connecting the wires? What about the green/ground wire from the light? The plug kit I haveis a two prong. I wasn't able to find a 3 prong plug with the tioggle/rocker switch attached."
The answer to it was this,"Use a three conductor whip or 2/c, ungrounded with a GFCI only. Or, you could skip all the trouble and go the easy route-battery powered lights which require NO AC."
BUT ... I do not know what those things are.Is that what I would ask for at the hardware store?


I have a chandelier I recieved as a birthday gift that has two sockets,without switches,and a ground wire,and a red bedroom with 1920's style window.One over head light,and one lamp,and still not enough lighting.
Now it is time for me to turn the chandelier into a hanging lamp,but everything I learned in shop class has escaped me.
It is a two wire lamp ,with two sockets,with ground,but I want to connect a turnstyle switch cord to it.(I think that's what it's called...the cord has a switch that you turn the knob).
How can I eliminate the need for a ground,as I have nowhere to ground it to?
Do I just put electrical tape over it,or do I have to replace the sockets,which do not have a switch,or do I connect the ground to the base of the lamp?
If it were a lamp that didn't require a ground,I wouldn't need help,but I have no idea how to do what I need to.
Please take a few minutes to answer this ?

fw2007 08-27-2008 07:22 PM

So, what you're saying is that you have a chandelier that is intended to be hung from a ceiling box?
The lamp has a ground wire (which is required for code I think).
You want to wire the chandelier to a cord that has a switch in-line.
Where do you want to connect the cord for power? Do you want to plug it into an outlet?

If you could provide a bit more info, maybe I or someone else can help.

FW

Fatalist 08-29-2008 01:11 AM

yes
 
I am going to hang it from two industrial hooks ,instead of an electrical box.
Yes ,you understand corectly.I want to wire the lamp,as if it were meant to be plugged in, and I need to know if 18 guage (the size of the extension cord) will be right or do I need to buy an extension cord that has a three prong( may have just answered my own question?
That will work won't it?
An extension cord with three prongs.
Forgive me ,I was very tired when I posted this.
Bear in mind,it will be wired into a box soon.I just need to know if the thing works on both sides.
I am only going to hang it on the cord rig for one time.
Then I'm hiring an electrician.

For future reference,
If I didn't have a three prong cord,and I wanted to ground it somewhere,can I ground it to the hook?
It seems strange to attach a wire to the base of the lamp itself, like my handy TIME LIFE basic wiring book suggests.
Shouldn't the ground be wired to the place where it will be attached from?

Big Bob 08-29-2008 10:31 AM

So you want to create a swag fixture.
Your dilemma appears to be the ground. Chain hung Chandeliers that require a ground use braided bare wire along side of the lamp cord that is laced through the chain and connected to the proper wire or grounded outlet box. I have seen a few swag fixtures do this also.

1920's Hmmm.... your wiring system is probably 2 wire Hot & neutral.
Unless you live in Chicago or NYC odds are your system is not in metal conduit or armored cable. If it were and metal connections were intact this could be turned into your ground.
Unless your house was rewired and the recepticals have a ground... double check that you have a green wire in the receptical box...and it s connected....turn the power off 1st. It is not legal nor is it nice to install a grounded outlet in a two wire system... This gets done...

You could study hard and make a system or have a ground wire system installed. For a little more $ you could rewire the house.

IMHO No one will advise you to disregard the ground wire on your fixture.
I have seen this alot.


Consider buying table or floor lamps designed without a ground wire.

Sell the chandelier on E-bay or at garage sale.



PS "can I ground this to the hook" only if the hook has a ground wire running to your solid galvanized water line (do not use the gas line, )or you run the wire to the exterior of the house ...drive a copper clad rod 8' down in the ground and clamp the wire to the rod. Read the proper grounding chapter again.

Fatalist 08-30-2008 05:46 AM

That reminds me,when the roofers were here to replace it, they got shocked badly and we had to turn off the electric, but the house is grounded.
What could that have been?

Most of our house has been rewired.
We do have two wires in all of our electrical outlets,and conduit boxes.

I want to use this light because it was a birthday gift.
I want to wire it ,like we did in shop class,using an extension cord,and a switch,inline,with two wires.
I want to eliminate the ground,by replacing the sockets,and make a swag lamp out of the frame .
It's pretty,and made of decorative metal, and goes well in the room.

Anywho,you have answered my question.
Thank you very much.

Now it's time for a new topic.

jrclen 08-30-2008 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Bob (Post 152894)
PS "can I ground this to the hook" only if the hook has a ground wire running to your solid galvanized water line (do not use the gas line, )or you run the wire to the exterior of the house ...drive a copper clad rod 8' down in the ground and clamp the wire to the rod. Read the proper grounding chapter again.

This is still not a ground. A ground is connected to the neutral bus on the main service panel, not to the earth or a water pipe. This is wrong and dangerous advice.

jrclen 08-30-2008 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fatalist (Post 153162)
That reminds me,when the roofers were here to replace it, they got shocked badly and we had to turn off the electric, but the house is grounded.
What could that have been?

Driving a nail through an electric wire?

fw2007 08-31-2008 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrclen (Post 153223)
Driving a nail through an electric wire?

I was wondering about that one myself.

FW

fw2007 08-31-2008 08:17 AM

I've got two ways you can do this:
First off, you need to connect the ground. It is there for your safety.
Use 3-wire cord for the lamp. #18 is fine, as long as it doesn't exceed the capacity of the wire (I think 18 is good for 7Amps for appliances, etc).

Method #1: Using a plastic switch box (the smallest one you can find that will fit the switch), put the switch in-line on the cord. Not pretty, but it would work. Use some sort of strain relief on the cord.

Method #2, much prettier, and more fun:
I was going to suggest a Radio Shack Plug 'N Power setup, but I cannot find these products on their web site any longer. Perhaps they have been discontinued.

Leviton makes, or used to make the same thing.
It's home automation, works by sending signals on the AC power line.

You could buy one 3-wire appliance module and one controller.
Just plug your hanging lamp (with 3-wire cord and plug) into the appliance module, and plug into a 3-wire receptacle.

Plug the controller module into a convenient receptacle, set the house and device codes, and you've got your switch, from anywhere in the house.
You can buy wireless systems as well, where you can mount a wireless controller anywhere, or use a keychain remote.

I have lots of this stuff sitting around in my attic, and am thinking of putting it to use again.

Kind of an off-beat idea, but it would work, it is legal, and it's fun to use!

FW

jrclen 08-31-2008 09:39 AM

Plug the ungrounded fixture into a GFCI protected receptacle and forget it.

Next we will be telling the guy to just buy a new house with the lights already installed. :laughing:


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