Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-31-2013, 01:06 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 21
Share |
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


I would like to know their uses and some examples

Thanks Dave

Lowcountrydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 01:09 AM   #2
Always learning...
 
fetzer85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Northern WV
Posts: 452
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Dave - did you try searching the internet for this info? I believe if you do you will find your answer rather easily.

fetzer85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 01:25 AM   #3
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 7,232
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Neutral is the return path for your AC hot.

Ground is the reference and safety connection.

In other words....if you have a floating transformer....if you decide to change the ground connection from your neutral to the hot....the hot will now be at ground potential and will now be your neutral.....

In other words....the neutral just happens to be the side of the AC that is tied to ground reference.
__________________
"The dream is free but the hustle is sold separately."

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 02:26 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 21
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Thanks for the replys. I actually tried to cancel the post. I didn't think the post went thrgh. I Googled it and found the explanation.

Dave
Lowcountrydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 08:39 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,946
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


An electrical circuit requires two conductors (wires) going out to the load (light, appliance, etc.). Current goes out on one conductor and returns on the other. (For alternating current the current reverses direction 120 times a second so as to have 60 flows each way alternating.)

For 120 volt household wiring it is customary to have one of the two conductors grounded. Not everywhere but just at the panel where the first main (or master) disconnecting breaker or switch is located. This conductor is the neutral; it is also (and formally) referred to as the grounded conductor. The other is referred to the hot conductor.

In a 120/240 volt system there are two hot conductors and one neutral. Voltage is 240 measured between the two hots and 120 measured between either hot and the neutral.

Modern wiring has an additional conductor (formally the equipment grounding conductor) that is connected to ground and should be connected to the framework or chassis of equipment. The EGC is not intended to carry current under normal conditions thus the need for a neutral accompanying the hot and a 3 prong plug and 3 wire cord. The EGC carries current safely back to the panel (where the interconnection between neutral and ground is) and back to the pole transformer in the event a defect in the equipment results in a live wire touching the chassis or framework. The EGC being at ground potential (by being connected to ground back at the panel) provides some protection against electrocution if a person touches the frame of the defective equipment and also some other grounded object such as a faucet or wet floor at the same time
__________________
Stop wasting time re-adjusting the pattern. Have several lawn sprinklers, one for each pattern.

Last edited by AllanJ; 03-31-2013 at 08:49 AM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 10:50 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,497
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Read about neutrals in MultiWire Branch Circuits (MWBC). Quite interesting how that works. See the 5th post at the following (with graphics). That shows how under certain situations, no electricity will flow through the neutral with an MWBC. BTW, the 3 wires going to your home from the electric company works the same.

http://www.electrical-contractor.net..._neutrals.html
Billy_Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 02:35 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 131
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_Bob View Post
Read about neutrals in MultiWire Branch Circuits (MWBC). Quite interesting how that works. See the 5th post at the following (with graphics). That shows how under certain situations, no electricity will flow through the neutral with an MWBC. BTW, the 3 wires going to your home from the electric company works the same.

http://www.electrical-contractor.net..._neutrals.html
Yes, this is balanced load/unbalanced load on 3-wire. Your dryer in your house with 120V electronics and 240V heating element works in the same fashion.
Protocol. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 07:21 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 21
Default

Please explain neutral and ground


Thanks! Electricity is very interesting. I really have enjoyed learning about it.

Dave

Lowcountrydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Unused ground lead as neutral? ramatsu Electrical 13 01-10-2012 07:44 PM
240 volt load/appliance and ground vs neutral kgize Electrical 7 04-22-2010 11:40 PM
This doesnt seem right. JoulesWinfield Electrical 27 07-26-2009 07:40 PM
Ground rod or not? brotherman Electrical 30 07-15-2008 04:58 PM
Nuetral from feeder cable to main panel question? TW Lucas Electrical 14 05-08-2008 11:33 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.