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-   -   Phantom Telephone and Coax cable in new home (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/phantom-telephone-coax-cable-new-home-60883/)

munir 01-03-2010 06:32 AM

Phantom Telephone and Coax cable in new home
 
Hey guys,
I seem to have 1 more telephone and Coaxial connection dropping into my basement than I have sockets in the house.

Its not from the phone company. I do not have a NID as its a new house and I've got VOIP so they never hooked me up.
Its not from the cable company either; the cable guy had to drill a line in from outside through the wall and we checked if any were already leading outside. They were not.

I didn't miss any sockets in the house, I've looked virtually everywhere possible. The cables go up into the main floor from my basement as do the other cables, but I've got no idea where they lead.


I'm debating on whether or not to spend the extra effort wiring up these phantom cables.

Any ideas where they might lead? How can I find out where they go?

Thanks =D

JohnJ0906 01-03-2010 06:34 AM

Check the attic. They might have put in as a spare.

AllanJ 01-03-2010 09:08 AM

You can use a continuity tester (or an ohmmeter) to find out which loose ends of currently unconnected cables match up.

Have handy a long 14 to 18 gauge wire (perhaps 100 feet) that can be used as an extension of one of the test prods of your meter and stretched from room to room or upstairs or down.

If you can't find other loose ends, it is okay to leave this project as an unfinished project of many years' duration.

Jim Port 01-03-2010 09:21 AM

A toner set commonly called a Fox and Hound may help you find and identify the cables. Gardner Bender has one with ends for cable and phone and alligator clips all built in for less than $40.

ninghai 01-03-2010 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 375751)
You can use a continuity tester (or an ohmmeter) to find out which loose ends of currently unconnected cables match up.

Have handy a long 14 to 18 gauge wire (perhaps 100 feet) that can be used as an extension of one of the test prods of your meter and stretched from room to room or upstairs or down.

no need for the long wire for continuity test. phone wires typically have 4 conductors in it. simply tie two of them (red and black for example) together in one end, then use the multimeter to test the other end on the same color conductors. if they are the same wire you just created a loop.

Billy_Bob 01-03-2010 11:35 AM

During construction, it is common for one "trade" to cut the wires of another "trade.

Like the air conditioning guys will come along and cut a phone wire or a security system wire.

Then they will come out and run a new wire before the drywall is installed.

So possible the wire went to one of the jacks you have, someone cut it, then they ran a replacement wire and did not remove the cut wire.

Scuba_Dave 01-03-2010 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ninghai (Post 375764)
no need for the long wire for continuity test. phone wires typically have 4 conductors in it. simply tie two of them (red and black for example) together in one end, then use the multimeter to test the other end on the same color conductors. if they are the same wire you just created a loop.

The problem is he doesn't know where the other end of the wire is located


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