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theatretch85 04-29-2009 11:18 PM

Passed my rough inspection, now what?
 
So I passed my rough inspection after I had to fix a few things. Here is what the inspector wrote up to be fixed prior to the re-inspection:

1. 6' or less to first receptacle in rooms
2. Receptacle required in hallway
3. Receptacles required within 6' or doorway and every 12' thereafter
4. GFCI required in all unfinished areas lower level
5. Smoke detector wiring

The receptacle within 6' of the doorway was for a bedroom that the first outlet on one side of the door was 6'7" measured linearly along the wall from the door, so I moved it about a foot closer to the door and was ok there. I took care of adding the outlet in the hallway, 2 additional outlets in the laundry/utility room that are not apart of the laundry circuit, and an outlet in the un-finished basement entry way. Wired up for 5 smoke detectors and one smoke/CO in the hallway. Passed the rough inspection this morning.

What is required for a final inspection other than all the outlets and switches being connected and installed? Do I screw all the outlets and switches into the box or leave them out for the inspector to see them? Do I make the final connections into the circuit panel before the final inspection? Just curious what they will be looking for on the final inspection trip....

frenchelectrican 04-29-2009 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 267405)
So I passed my rough inspection after I had to fix a few things. Here is what the inspector wrote up to be fixed prior to the re-inspection:

1. 6' or less to first receptacle in rooms
2. Receptacle required in hallway
3. Receptacles required within 6' or doorway and every 12' thereafter
4. GFCI required in all unfinished areas lower level
5. Smoke detector wiring

The receptacle within 6' of the doorway was for a bedroom that the first outlet on one side of the door was 6'7" measured linearly along the wall from the door, so I moved it about a foot closer to the door and was ok there. I took care of adding the outlet in the hallway, 2 additional outlets in the laundry/utility room that are not apart of the laundry circuit, and an outlet in the un-finished basement entry way. Wired up for 5 smoke detectors and one smoke/CO in the hallway. Passed the rough inspection this morning.

That good you pass the rough inspection there.
Quote:

What is required for a final inspection other than all the outlets and switches being connected and installed? Do I screw all the outlets and switches into the box or leave them out for the inspector to see them? Do I make the final connections into the circuit panel before the final inspection? Just curious what they will be looking for on the final inspection trip....
Normally most electrician don't install the switches or receptales until after the drywall is installed and mudded and painted but for final inspections some inspectors want everything be working before they can give you the C/O cerifition.

For myself get everything done properly double check all the juction box to make sure they are at proper depth and double check all the conductors to make sure they are not damaged in any format before you engerized the circuits.

Yes you will have to connect the circuits to the load centre and follow your state/local codes.

{ In France we do megger everything before we get the POCO enerized the whole system for safety issue ( you don't want anything get ya espcally if you have 415 volt circuit there ) }

I will leave rest of comment open I am sure few other electricans will reply few more details along the way in case I miss something along the way.

Merci,Marc

theatretch85 04-30-2009 12:18 AM

Thanks Marc, been a while since I've seen you posting on here, good to see you back again.

My rough inspection required that all my boxes be pigtailed and ready for the devices. As for box fill, I made sure I checked box fill on everything; only had one round ceiling box I put in the laundry/utility room for the smoke detector branch was over fill by 2 cu in so I had to change the box to a deep 4" box with the round mud-ring. I of course changed this box prior to the rough inspection. It has 3 14/3 and 1 14/2 and the original box was only rated at 22 cu in.

I have already energized some of the lighting circuits, not exactly wired into the panel via knockouts, primarily because I plan on changing the panel out before the final inspection.

Yeah, 415 volts would not be fun to find a fault somewhere in the line! I have found a few wires with my drill and the sawsall creating some additional and un-expected rewiring. Gotten better at checking the other side of the joist before drilling the hole, haha.

frenchelectrican 04-30-2009 12:37 AM

However one thing it clicked in my mind due you live in state of Minnestota I do know they do required AFCI breakers there so you will go extra step when you hook up switches and receptales make sure you don't let netural conductor touch the ground conductor otherwise it will trip on ya as soon you flip the breaker on.

The GFCI/AFCI is very simauir what we have in France we called RCD or terria dectetor.

Merci,Marc

Just Bill 04-30-2009 06:57 AM

In general, the smoke detector circuit should be wired into a frequently used circuit, not by itself. If something in the circuit fails, you will notice it quickly, not after the fire. Battery backup, usually required, eliminates the need I just stated.

joed 04-30-2009 07:27 AM

A final inspection is normally after everything is hooked up and working. That is why it is called final.

Plumbvoltage 04-30-2009 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 267475)
In general, the smoke detector circuit should be wired into a frequently used circuit, not by itself. If something in the circuit fails, you will notice it quickly, not after the fire. Battery backup, usually required, eliminates the need I just stated.

Mine are wired into the master bedroom.

kbsparky 04-30-2009 07:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 267475)
In general, the smoke detector circuit should be wired into a frequently used circuit, not by itself....

But not in DELAWARE, which is where you are located??:no:

Delaware requires a dedicated smokes circuit, NON-AFI, and a locking clip on the breaker.

Overkill, IMO but them's the state rules.:mad:

47_47 04-30-2009 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plumbvoltage (Post 267490)
Mine are wired into the master bedroom.

Mine are with my monitored house alarm.

theatretch85 04-30-2009 11:45 AM

My smoke detectors are wired up through the misc lighting circuit in the basement which powers the lights in the bedroom, laundry/utility room, and an outlet for the water softener. Also will power a light in the garage entry way downstairs. Speaking with the inspector, only my new circuits need to be AFCI, so the existing circuits that I am not touching don't need to be updated just becuase I am changing out the panel.

I know all the outlets and switches need to be hooked up, but my question about the final inspection was more about do I screw all the outlets and switches into the boxes and put cover plates on? Do I leave them hanging out the box and just wire them up? Do I supply power to the circuits prior to the final inspection? I would imagine he will want to see a few outlets and switches, but he's already theoretically seen the pigtails wired up in the boxes ready for the final connection to the respective outlets, switches and lights.

comp1911 04-30-2009 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 267617)
My smoke detectors are wired up through the misc lighting circuit in the basement which powers the lights in the bedroom, laundry/utility room, and an outlet for the water softener. Also will power a light in the garage entry way downstairs. Speaking with the inspector, only my new circuits need to be AFCI, so the existing circuits that I am not touching don't need to be updated just becuase I am changing out the panel.

I know all the outlets and switches need to be hooked up, but my question about the final inspection was more about do I screw all the outlets and switches into the boxes and put cover plates on? Do I leave them hanging out the box and just wire them up? Do I supply power to the circuits prior to the final inspection? I would imagine he will want to see a few outlets and switches, but he's already theoretically seen the pigtails wired up in the boxes ready for the final connection to the respective outlets, switches and lights.

I'm in MN too. The final's I've had done, the inspector wanted it all done, cover plates on and powered up. He checked the bath and garage for GFCI, checks the recepts with the "checker" and checks the bedroom breakers to see if they are arc fault.

theatretch85 04-30-2009 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by comp1911 (Post 267755)
I'm in MN too. The final's I've had done, the inspector wanted it all done, cover plates on and powered up. He checked the bath and garage for GFCI, checks the recepts with the "checker" and checks the bedroom breakers to see if they are arc fault.

Awesome, thanks for the reply. I wonder how hard they look for the new tamper resistant outlets....

frenchelectrican 05-03-2009 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 267764)
Awesome, thanks for the reply. I wonder how hard they look for the new tamper resistant outlets....


With some receptales it is not that hard to find it some of them will stamp "TR" so you can not miss it or spot white shutters as well.

Merci,Marc


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